beta-endorphin


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Related to beta-endorphin: dopamine

beta-endorphin

(bā′tə-ĕn-dôr′fĭn, bē′-)
n.
An endorphin produced by the pituitary gland that is a potent pain suppressant.

beta-endorphin

An endorphin derived from proopiomelanocortin (POMC) via beta-lipotropin, which is linked to hypophyseal secretion and pain perception.

Normal
Beta-endorphin is present in the CNS, pituitary gland and peripheral tissues.

Abnormal
Beta-endorphin is increased in pain, stress, endotoxic shock, opiate addiction, premenstrual syndrome, childbirth, exercise, mental disorders and hypertension.

beta-endorphin

One of the body's own substances with morphine-like actions. It is part of the precursor molecule of ACTH.

beta

the second letter of the Greek alphabet, B or β; used to denote the second position in a chemical classification system. Often used in names of chemical compounds to distinguish one of two or more isomers or to indicate the position of substituent atoms or groups in certain compounds. Also used to distinguish types of radioactive decay; brain rhythms or waves; adrenergic receptors; secretory cells of the various organs of the body that stain with basic dyes, such as the beta cells of the pancreas; and the type of hemolysis induced by bacteria that results in a zone of complete hemolysis when grown on blood agar, except for staphylococci.

beta adrenergic
beta-adrenergic receptors,
β-adrenergic receptors specific sites on effector cells that respond to epinephrine. There are two types: β1-receptors, found in the heart and small intestine, and β2-receptors, found in the bronchi, blood vessels and uterus.
beta agonists
beta barrels
a form of secondary structure of a polypeptide in which β strands of amino acids are wound into a super secondary structure; usually interconnected by α helical regions of the polypeptide on the outside of the molecule.
beta-blocker
a drug that blocks the action of epinephrine at beta-adrenergic receptors on cells of effector organs. There are two types of these receptors: β1-receptors in the myocardium and β2-receptors in the bronchial and vascular smooth muscles. The principal effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation are increased heart rate and contractility, vasodilation of the arterioles that supply the skeletal muscles, and relaxation of bronchial muscles.
beta brain waves
those having a frequency of more than 10 hertz (pulsations per second); seen during wakefulness. See also electroencephalography.
beta-carboline indoleamine alkaloid
poisoning causes a nervous syndrome of hyper- or hypomotility, muscle tremor, flexed paresis of fore- or hindlimbs, hypermetria, walking backwards, convulsions. A plant poison found in Peganum, Tribulus, Kallstroemia spp.
beta carbon
carbon-3 of a molecule or the carbon atom two on from the function group of a molecule, the carbon(s) of which are not included in the lettering.
beta-endorphin
hormone secreted by central nervous system, hypothalamus, gastrointestinal tract. See also endorphin.
beta fibrillosis
beta-folded domains
compact, locally folded region of tertiary structure containing the β-sheets or β-turns.
beta hemolysin
is a sphingomyelinase and is produced by staphylococci. It produces partial hemolysis of sheep and cattle erythrocytes. It appears to have little pathogenic effect. See also beta hemolysis.
beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl coenzyme A
1. intermediate in the formation of ketones.
2. key starting compound in the synthesis of cholesterol.
beta-hydroxybutyrate
salt of the major circulating ketone body in animals, formed from the reduction of acetoacetic acid.
beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase
mitochondrial enzyme catalyzing the NADH-linked-reduction of acetoacetate to β-hydroxybutyrate.
beta-ketobutyric acid
beta particle
an electron emitted from a nucleus.
beta radiation
see radiation injury, radiotherapy.
beta sheet (β-sheet)
a common structural feature of many proteins in which the single polypeptide chain is folded back and forth upon itself with each folded section running in an opposite direction to its nearest neighbors. The folded sections are held together by hydrogen bonds and the arrangement which occurs, particularly in the core of proteins, confers great stability on the molecule.
beta subunit
second-named chain (or subunit) occurring in the functional organization of macromolecules, usually proteins, containing two or more chains.
References in periodicals archive ?
We found that low to moderate but not high doses of alcohol increase the release of beta-endorphin in the VTA, one of the brain regions shown to be important for mediating the rewarding effect of alcohol," said Gianoulakis.
The neurotransmitter beta-endorphin is an opioid produced by the pituitary gland.
Estrogens modulate the circadian rhythm of hypothalamic beta-endorphin contents in female rats.
Increases in cerebrospinal fluid level of beta-endorphins up to 219%, plasma endorphins up to 98%, and cerebrospinal fluid serotonin up to 200% have been demonstrated in normal volunteers receiving 20 minutes of CES.
For example, beta-endorphin produced within the testes suppresses testicular testosterone production and release (Gianoulakis 1990).
Naltrexone also blocks autoinhibition of POMC by the body's natural opiate beta-endorphin.
The beta-endorphin limb causes a reduction in emotional and physical pain.
Similarly, naltrexone's propensity to reduce alcohol intake in humans is greater in persons who have higher beta-endorphin levels (Gianoulakis et al.
During estrogen-androgen therapy, estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels decreased, while beta-endorphin levels did not change significantly.
The positive effects of the sun and simulated sunlight include vitamin D synthesis in your skin, lifting the moods of seasonal depression sufferers, and increased beta-endorphin output from the brain, which creates an overall feeling of well-being.