beta-carotene


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beta-carotene

Etymology: Gk, beta; L, carota, carrot
a vitamin A precursor and ultraviolet screening agent.
indication It is prescribed to ameliorate photosensitivity in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria.
contraindications It is used with caution in patients with impaired renal or hepatic function. Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects No serious adverse reactions have been observed. Diarrhea may occur.

beta-carotene

A natural red-orange fat-soluble retinoid provitamin metabolised to vitamin A in the body; it is an antioxidant and free-radical scavenger, protecting cells against oxidation damage linked to cancer; it is present in fresh fruits and vegetables, and has immunostimulatory activity; increased BC consumption is associated with a decreased risk of bladder, colon, lung, skin cancer and cancer cell growth in vitro.

Health benefits
Minor protection against heart disease, strokes and effects of ageing.

beta-carotene

precursor of vitamin A, usually ample in a normal diet, which is converted in the body to retinol. This and other carotenoids also function as antioxidants, protecting cells against oxidation damage. Beta-carotene supplements do not appear to have any ergogenic effect. Thus, it is recommended that this pro-vitamin is best obtained through the diet. See also vitamins; appendix 4.2 .

beta-carotene (bā·t·ke·rō·tēn),

n a plant pigment, antioxidant, and biochemical precursor to vitamin A. Large doses may increase the risk of lung cancer and cardiac disease.

beta-carotene


β-carotene

References in periodicals archive ?
Bausch + Lomb, which supplied supplements for both AREDS trials, still sells the AREDS1 formula with beta-carotene (left) or with lutein in its place (not shown).
Table 77: Leading Players in the US Beta-Carotene Market(2013): Percentage Share Breakdown of Volume Sales for DSM,BASF and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-2Cancer Statistics III-3Table 78: Number of New Cancer Cases in the US by Sex(2014E) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-3
In the laboratory, the researchers also tested the bioavailability of beta-carotene from orange-fleshed honeydew melon tissue.
Beta-carotene is a well-established food colorant and pro-vitamin A source.
Sixty-two women volunteered for the study, of which 29 of them were found to be carrying the genetic variation which prevented them from being able to sufficiently convert beta-carotene into vitamin A.
They found that many staple crops produce beta-carotene, but only orange ones can store it in their flesh.
Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study Group.
A diet high in beta-carotene, alongside vitamins C and E, has also been shown to make you less likely to suffer eyesight problems in old age, such as cataracts.
Studies have also shown that people with higher than average intakes of antioxidants - beta-carotene, lute in and vitamins C and E - appear to have a reduced risk of developing cataracts.
Studies have also shown that people with higher than average intakes of anti-oxidants, beta-carotene, lutein and vitamins C and E, appear to have a reduced risk of developing cataracts.
Flavonoids include beta-carotene and related carotenoids, which are responsible for many of the yellows, oranges, reds, and greens in produce.
Broccoli: Contains folate, fiber, calcium, vitamin C, beta-carotene, lutein and vitamin K.