beta-amyloid


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

beta-amyloid

(bā′tə-ăm′ə-loid′, bē′-)
n.
A protein fragment formed by the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein that aggregates into deposits characteristically found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Also called amyloid beta-peptide, amyloid beta-protein, beta-amyloid peptide, beta-amyloid protein.

beta-amyloid

A4, β—amyloid Neurology A 4 kD polypeptide encoded on chromosome 21 arising from altered processing of amyloid precursor protein, an integral membrane glycoprotein secreted as a truncated carboxyl-terminal molecule; BA forms plaques in the brains of Pts with Alzheimer's disease–AD, Down syndrome, infectious encephalopathy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy; BA is found in skin, intestine, adrenal gland. See Alzheimer's disease, Amyloid, Presenilin. Cf Alpha2-macroglobulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuraceq PET Shows High Sensitivity and Specificity and High Predictive Value for Detection of Neuritic Beta-amyloid Plaques; May Be Valuable Adjunct to Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
PET scans using radio-labeled flutemetamol were safe to use in vivo and confirmed the presence or absence of neuritic beta-amyloid levels "with high sensitivity and specificity" in a phase III trial involving 68 terminally ill older adults.
The research focuses on the detection of beta-amyloid, a protein which folds incorrectly and forms clumps in the brains of those with Alzheimer's; one of the hallmarks of the disease.
Deposits of beta-amyloid plaques are one of the hallmarks of AD.
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who examined the association between sleep variables and a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease in older adults, found that reports of shorter sleep duration and poorer sleep quality were associated with a greater beta-Amyloid burden, a hallmark of the disease.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown how a protein fragment known as beta-amyloid, strongly implicated in Alzheimer's disease, begins destroying synapses before it clumps into plaques that lead to nerve cell death.
They found that consuming one gram of omega-3 per day - equal to about half a fillet of salmon per week - more than the average was associated with 20% to 30% lower blood beta-amyloid levels.
Beta-amyloid clumps together in the brains of Alzheimer's patients, forming deposits that result in the destruction of nerve cells.
Participants were asked questions about their diet, and had their blood tested for beta-amyloid.
Dr Giulio Maria Pasinetti, The Saunders Family Professor in Neurology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine headed the research which is the first of its kind and examines the ability of grape-derived polyphenols to prevent the generation of a specific form of beta-amyloid peptide, a substance in the brain long known to cause the neurotoxicity associated with Alzheimer disease.
Lower plasma beta-amyloid 42 and 42/40 levels have been associated with incident dementia, but results are conflicting and few have investigated cognitive decline among elders without dementia.
Professor Martins is credited, in collaboration with Australian and German scientists, with isolating beta-amyloid protein, which forms amyloid plaque deposits in the brain, a characteristic diagnostic feature of Alzheimer's disease.