beta agonist


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beta agonist

A drug that stimulates adrenergic receptors in the lungs, heart, uterus, and other organs. Beta agonists are used to treat asthma and chronic obstructive lung diseases and to manage pregnancy.
See also: agonist
References in periodicals archive ?
Nelson et al (20) compared the efficacy and safety of a combination of inhaled steroid and long-acting beta agonist (fluticasone and salmeterol) with an inhaled steroid and a leukotriene-receptor antagonist (fluticasone and montelukast).
The bronchodilating effect of a beta agonist can be measured on the basis of airflow change, as indicated by, for example, a change in FEV1 or peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR).
The research team found that these variants significantly increased urgent outpatient visits and treatment with oral or injectable steroids because of increased asthma symptoms in patients treated with a long-acting beta agonist.
The first was for Roche's thyroid hormone receptor (THR) beta agonist, a clinically ready candidate for the control of cholesterol, triglyceride levels and potential in insulin sensitization/diabetes.
Sobetirome is a new selective thyroid hormone receptor beta agonist that may activate reverse cholesterol transport.
In pre-clinical primate studies, QRX-431, a selective thyroid beta agonist, lowered LDL, lipoprotein (a) and weight without significantly increasing heart rate.
Supply medicament fixed combination corticosteroid / beta agonist powder inhaler.
Since Merck pulled Zilmax, Reuters reports cattle feeders have switched to beta agonist rival product Ractopamine marketed as Optaflexx produced by Elanco Animal Health, which we think is irresponsible and unacceptable.
More recently, long-acting beta-2 agonist drugs (LABA) salmeterol and eformoterol have gained popularity in the management of asthma that is not well-controlled with short-acting beta agonist and inhaled corticosteroid therapy (ICS).
Safety concerns regarding long-acting beta agonist (LABA) therapy date back to a major study reported more than 7 years ago, and a 2008 FDA meta-analysis indicated that treatment with LABAs--either alone or combined with an inhaled corti-costeroid (ICS)--is associated with an increased risk of severe asthma symptoms and hospitalizations as well as deaths in adults and children with asthma, compared with people not on a LABA.
The first line drug of choice is a beta agonist such as albuterol or salbutamol.