beryllium


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to beryllium: Beryllium oxide, Beryllium copper, Chronic Beryllium Disease

beryllium

 (Be) [bĕ-ril´e-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 4, atomic weight 9.012. (See Appendix 6.) Ingestion of excessive amounts can cause berylliosis.

ber·yl·li·um (Be),

(ber-il'ē-ŭm),
A white metal element belonging to the alkaline earths; atomic no. 4., atomic wt. 9.012182.
[G. beryllos, beryl]

beryllium

/be·ryl·li·um/ (Be) (bah-ril´le-um) a chemical element, at. no. 4.

beryllium (Be)

a steel-gray, lightweight metallic element. Its atomic number is 4; its atomic mass is 9.012. Beryllium occurs naturally as beryl and is used in metallic alloys and in fluorescent powders. Inhalation of beryllium fumes or particles may cause the formation of granulomas in the lungs, skin, and subcutaneous tissues. See also berylliosis.

ber·yl·li·um

(Be) (bĕr-ilē-ŭm)
A toxic white metal element belonging to the alkaline earths; atomic no. 4, atomic wt. 9.012182; widely used in dentistry as a hardening agent in alloys.

Beryllium

A steel-grey, metallic mineral used in the aerospace and nuclear industries and in a variety of manufacturing processes.
Mentioned in: Berylliosis

ber·yl·li·um

(bĕr-ilē-ŭm)
A white metal element belonging to the alkaline earths; a component of some alloys used in dentistry.

beryllium (Be) (bəril´ēəm),

n a steel-gray, lightweight metallic element with an atomic number of 4 and an atomic weight of 9.01218. Alloys are used in fluorescent powders. Inhalation of beryllium fumes or particles may cause the formation of granulomas in the lungs, skin, and subcutaneous tissues.

beryllium

a chemical element, atomic number 4, atomic weight 9.012, symbol Be. See Table 6.

beryllium sulfate
used as a vaccine adjuvant. Causes local granuloma formation which is believed to enhance antibody formation by stimulating T lymphocytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the basis of geographic regions, global Beryllium Aluminum Alloy market is segmented into seven key market segments namely North America, Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Asia Pacific, Japan, and Middle East & Africa.
In 2004, South Korean investigators reported nine cases of a disease thought to have been eliminated decades before: acute beryllium disease (ABD) (Kim et al.
23) This posed a clear institutional conflict of interest, because the AEC and DOE were also responsible for ensuring a continuing supply of beryllium for the nuclear weapons arsenal.
When cast, the high strength beryllium copper alloys also provide very accurate replication of fine detail.
Beryllium is a highly useful metal, but beryllium dust and fume can cause severe, debilitating and sometimes fatal lung disease," said USW Health, Safety and Environment Director Mike Wright.
Products include precious and non-precious specialty metals, inorganic chemicals and powders, specialty coatings, specialty engineered beryllium alloys, beryllium and beryllium composites, and engineered clad and plated metal systems.
Successfully playing puppeteer with entangled beryllium ions and preserving entanglement even as it is transferred to the larger system may come in handy as researchers search for signs of entanglement in bigger systems.
Occupational exposure to beryllium in the workplace can cause a lung disease that may be fatal, and new exposure limits for the element in air and on surfaces have been established in order to reduce the exposure of workers.
The flame spectroscopy method of chemical analysis of beryllium used by Rosenman et al.
The protons will be incident upon a beryllium target with a thickness of 3 mm, sufficient to stop all of the protons.
The bulk of the cases are anticipated to involve radiation-induced cancers from working with nuclear materials, but workers with beryllium disease or silicosis caused by their energy employment would also be eligible, Eagan said.
The preliminary results of health assessments of nuclear weapons production workers - who worked for Department of Energy (DOE) contractors - conducted by Elizabeth Averill Samaras for the Alice Hamilton College of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW) reveal worker concerns about future health problems, inadequate health insurance and high levels of exposure to substances such as ionizing radiation, beryllium, asbestos and carbon tetrachloride.