benzodiazepine


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Related to benzodiazepine: benzodiazepine drugs

benzodiazepine

 [ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn]
any of a group of drugs having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects. The group includes the sedative-hypnotics chlordiazepoxide (librium), clorazepate (tranxene), diazepam (valium), flurazepam (dalmane), and oxazepam (serax), which are used as antianxiety agents; and clonazepam (klonopin), an anticonvulsant.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn),
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (for example, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

benzodiazepine

/ben·zo·di·az·e·pine/ (ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn) any of a group of compounds having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects.

benzodiazepine

(bĕn′zō-dī-ăz′ə-pēn′, -pĭn)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds with a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological effects, used as antianxiety agents, muscle relaxants, sedatives, hypnotics, and sometimes as anticonvulsants.

benzodiazepine

A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics.
 
Effects
Sedation, hypnosis, reduced motor activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsive.
 
Adverse effects
Physical and psychological dependence.

benzodiazepine

Pharmacology A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics Effects Sedation, hypnotic, ↓ activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Physical and psychological dependence

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (e.g., diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

Benzodiazepine

A class of drugs that have a hypnotic and sedative action, used mainly as tranquilizers to control symptoms of anxiety.

benzodiazepine

parent compound of several psychoactive drugs (e.g. nitrazepam, temazepam and diazepam) used as anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics; they do not specifically contraindicate local anaesthetics, but as they can cause drowsiness, ataxia, dysarthria and impaired consciousness, their concomitant use could mask early signs of toxic effects of local anaesthetics

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
Class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

benzodiazepine (ben´zōdīaz´əpēn),

n a drug used to decrease emotional stress, lessen anxiety, and bring about sleep.

benzodiazepine

any of a group of drugs having similar molecular structure. A drug in this group that has significant use in veterinary medicine is diazepam (Valium).
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28) The most frequently discussed trial compared the effectiveness of passionflower to the benzodiazepine oxazepam.
The Quebec database permitted identification of all subjects with prescriptions for benzodiazepines during 2000-2009, a period 5-10 years prior to diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.
Alcohol was involved in nearly one-quarter of all opioid pain reliever--related deaths and just over 20% of deaths related to benzodiazepines, according to a study of 2010 data released by the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
In the United States, local regulations may allow or disallow administration of benzodiazepine.
Adjunctive benzodiazepines have a role in treatment.
Consumption of benzodiazepines is often chronic, with many people taking them over a period (often several years) that significantly exceeds recommended good practice guidelines that suggest limiting the duration to two to four weeks.
Symptoms of benzodiazepine discontinuation include the appear-ance of recurrence or relapse symptoms, rebound symptoms, addiction, or true withdrawal.
Benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence: GABAA receptor complex locus of change.
8m on benzodiazepines including diazepam in 2009 - up from pounds 2m in 2000.
The Withdrawal Assessment Tool-1 (WAT-1): An assessment instrument for monitoring opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms in pediatric patients.
To develop a model, the first logistic regression included benzodiazepine exposure, BAC and a BAC-squared term (to identify the possibility of quadratic effects), sex, age, age squared, previous driver history, other medication usage, and all two- and three-way interactions.
Researchers from Switzerland and the United States found that so-called benzodiazepine drugs, such as Ativan, Xanax and Valium, exert a calming effect by boosting action of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the same way as addictive drugs like opioids and cannabinoids.