benzodiazepine


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Related to benzodiazepine: benzodiazepine drugs

benzodiazepine

 [ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn]
any of a group of drugs having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects. The group includes the sedative-hypnotics chlordiazepoxide (librium), clorazepate (tranxene), diazepam (valium), flurazepam (dalmane), and oxazepam (serax), which are used as antianxiety agents; and clonazepam (klonopin), an anticonvulsant.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn),
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (for example, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

benzodiazepine

/ben·zo·di·az·e·pine/ (ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn) any of a group of compounds having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects.

benzodiazepine

(bĕn′zō-dī-ăz′ə-pēn′, -pĭn)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds with a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological effects, used as antianxiety agents, muscle relaxants, sedatives, hypnotics, and sometimes as anticonvulsants.

benzodiazepine

A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics.
 
Effects
Sedation, hypnosis, reduced motor activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsive.
 
Adverse effects
Physical and psychological dependence.

benzodiazepine

Pharmacology A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics Effects Sedation, hypnotic, ↓ activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Physical and psychological dependence

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (e.g., diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

Benzodiazepine

A class of drugs that have a hypnotic and sedative action, used mainly as tranquilizers to control symptoms of anxiety.

benzodiazepine

parent compound of several psychoactive drugs (e.g. nitrazepam, temazepam and diazepam) used as anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics; they do not specifically contraindicate local anaesthetics, but as they can cause drowsiness, ataxia, dysarthria and impaired consciousness, their concomitant use could mask early signs of toxic effects of local anaesthetics

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
Class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

benzodiazepine (ben´zōdīaz´əpēn),

n a drug used to decrease emotional stress, lessen anxiety, and bring about sleep.

benzodiazepine

any of a group of drugs having similar molecular structure. A drug in this group that has significant use in veterinary medicine is diazepam (Valium).
References in periodicals archive ?
21) Benzodiazepine use has been associated with an increased risk for falls among older adults, (22,23) with an increased risk of fractures (24) that can be fatal.
Opioids will include a warning regarding prescribing with benzodiazepines and other central nervous system depressants, including alcohol.
Additionally, due to the unique medical needs and benefit/risk considerations for patients undergoing medication-assisted therapy treatment (MAT) to treat opioid addiction and dependence, the FDA is continuing to examine available evidence regarding the use of benzodiazepines and opioids as part of MAT.
The prevalence of the use of psychotropic in women, benzodiazepine among them, was observed in several studies (3,8,11,23-25), insomnia and anxiety were the main reasons women use these drugs (3).
21,22) Specific combinations of herbs have also been used to treat insomnia such as Valeriana officinalis and Humulus lupus, (23) however, one of these herbs--Passiflora incarnata--may be particularly useful as an alternative to benzodiazepine medication.
If catatonic symptomatology does not cease after benzodiazepine or electro-convulsive therapy, it is recommended to use atypical antipsychotics, but to maintain benzodiazepines in the therapeutic regimen.
To the best of our knowledge, no published study has been done in Pakistan exploring the pattern of benzodiazepine prescription specifically in internal medicine outpatient medical clinic.
Benzodiazepine withdrawal is managed by giving oral diazepam 10-20 mg four times on the first day.
In the current study, researchers from France and Canada investigated the relationship between the risk of AD and exposure to benzodiazepines that had been prescribed at least 5 years before.
Selon l'ANSM, 11,5 millions de Francais ont consomme au moins une fois une benzodiazepine en 2012, dont 7 millions pour l'anxiete et 4,2 millions pour des troubles du sommeil.