aniline

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Related to benzeneamine: phenylamine

aniline

 [an´ĭ-lin]
an oily liquid from coal tar and indigo or prepared by reducing nitrobenzene; the parent substance of colors or dyes derived from coal tar. Aniline and its derivatives are an important cause of serious industrial poisoning. Household items such as indelible ink, shoe dye, and some wax crayons have been associated with poisonings. Routes of exposure include the respiratory tract, the mouth, and percutaneous absorption. Aniline from the mother can cross the placental barrier to poison a fetus. The predominant acute toxic effect is methemoglobinemia.

an·i·line

(an'i-lin, -lēn),
An oily, colorless, or brownish liquid, of aromatic odor and acrid taste, which is the parent substance of many synthetic dyes; derived from benzene by the substitution of the group -NH2 for one of the hydrogen atoms. Aniline is highly toxic, may cause industrial poisoning, and may be carcinogenic.
[Ar. an-nil, indigo]

aniline

/an·i·line/ (an´ĭ-lin) the parent substance of colors or dyes derived from coal tar; it is an important cause of serious industrial poisoning associated with bone marrow depression as well as methemoglobinemia, and high doses or prolonged exposure may be carcinogenic.

aniline (C6H5NH2)

[an′ilēn]
Etymology: Ar, alnil, indigo
an oily, colorless poisonous liquid with a strong odor and burning taste, formerly extracted from the indigo plant and now made synthetically from nitrobenzene and used in the manufacture of aniline dyes. Industrial workers exposed to aniline are at risk of developing methemoglobinemia and bone marrow suppression. Also called amidobenzene, benzenamine.

an·i·line

(an'i-lin)
An oily, colorless or brownish liquid, of aromatic odor and acrid taste, which is the parent substance of many synthetic dyes. Aniline is highly toxic and may cause industrial poisoning.
[Ar. an-nil, indigo]