benzene poisoning

benzene poisoning

a toxic condition caused by ingestion of benzene, inhalation of benzene fumes, or exposure to benzene-related products such as toluene or xylene, characterized by blurred vision, nausea, headache, dizziness, and incoordination. In acute cases, respiratory failure, convulsions, or ventricular fibrillation may cause death. Chronic exposure may result in aplastic anemia (a form of leukemia). See also nitrobenzene poisoning.

benzene poisoning

Poisoning with the widely used industrial solvent and raw material benzene. There is dizziness, EUPHORIA, headache, weakness, trembling, clumsiness, tightness in the chest, coma and convulsions. Long-term, small-dose poisoning causes loss of appetite, irritability, severe ANAEMIA, LEUKAEMIA and LYMPHOMAS.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of exposures to extremely high benzene concentrations in Italy as early as the 1920s, veritable epidemics of severe and chronic benzene poisoning had been identified.
The only recognized cases of poisoning by benzene published in the country in this period are four cases of bone-marrow aplasia, identified in the academic studies of Cillio and Oliveira, and the four cases of bone-marrow aplasia with 106 compatible cases with benzene poisoning of the SESI Outpatient Clinic.
The most remarkable aspect of this period was the great number of cases of benzene poisoning diagnosed via the development of activities by workers' unions and various public health services in the field of worker health.
The effects of chronic benzene poisoning in exposed workers can be detected by monitoring blood counts at regular intervals.
Considering the hematopoietic toxicity and carcinogenicity of benzene and G6PD deficiency affecting over 400 million individuals worldwide, we provided novel insights into the protective mechanisms of G6PD-deficient population against benzene poisoning.
Polymorphisms in phase I and phase II metabolism genes and risk of chronic benzene poisoning in a Chinese occupational population," Carcinogenesis, vol.
In China, benzene is regularly used in manufacturing industries, and historically high levels of occupational benzene exposure have been reported, with a number of reports describing cases of benzene poisoning in exposed Chinese workers (Liu et al.
Her quick actions mitigated the various complications associated with fuel absorption into the body, including benzene poisoning.
A single nucleotide polymorphism in TNF-[alpha] was previously associated with susceptibility to bone marrow dysplasia in chronic benzene poisoning (Lv et al.
Metabolic enzymes involved in benzene activation or detoxification, including NAD(P)H, quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), cytochrome P450 2E1 (CY2E1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione-S-transferase mu-1 (GSTM1), and glutathione-S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1), were studied for their roles in human susceptibility to benzene poisoning.
Workers exposed to benzene may potentially suffer chronic benzene poisoning (BP).
Benzene poisoning was diagnosed from 1980 to 1998 by the local authorized Occupational Disease Diagnostic Team, and patients were registered in the hospitals of prevention and treatment for occupational diseases, which cooperated with us.