benign

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Related to benignity: longanimity

benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

/be·nign/ (bĕ-nīn´) not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

[binīn′]
Etymology: L, benignus, kind
(of a tumor) noncancerous and therefore not a direct threat to life, even though treatment eventually may be required for health or cosmetic reasons. See also benign neoplasm. Compare malignant.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

benign

non-malignant, non-invasive and non-threatening

benign,

adj noncancerous; descriptive term for tumors, moles, and growths.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign (bēnīn´),

adj a condition that, untreated or with symptomatic therapy, will not become life threatening. It is used particularly in relation to tumors, which may be benign or malignant. They do not invade surrounding tissues and do not metastasize to other parts of the body. The word is slightly imprecise, as some can, due to mass effect, cause life-threatening complications.

benign

not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign enzootic paresis
see porcine viral encephalomyelitis.
benign fibrillators
horses with a history of poor performance in races which suffer an attack of atrial fibrillation during or immediately after a race which soon recovers spontaneously so that the abnormality often goes undetected.
benign footrot
occurs under very wet conditions. Caused by Dichelobacter nodosus of low virulence. There is dermatitis of the interdigital skin and minimal underrunning of horn at the heel. See also interdigital dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
A large lesion with heterogeneous attenuation and irregular contours is suspicious of malignancy, as compared with a small, well-defined, smoothly marginated, homogenous lesion which favours benignity.
Is it not time we realised that the benignity of religious pluralism is nothing more than a desperate marriage of hope and ignorance?
Elements of the state-of-the-art discovery and development program deployed by Veracyte's scientists and described in the article include: using large numbers of "real world" FNA samples to incorporate into the test the breadth of clinical samples that it may encounter; employing a whole-genome approach to identify genes that best differentiate benignity from malignancy, coupled with machine-learning algorithms and sophisticated statistical approaches to make sense of the large amount of genomic data; and utilizing large, prospective, multi-center clinical studies for discovery and clinical validation.
Dunn advocated that strict neutrality, not benignity, is the proper role for government in regard to religion.
Thus, surgical resection is required to make the differential diagnoses of retroperitoneal or adrenal masses and to confirm benignity.
Osteoblastomas are characterized by both benignity and aggressive behavior, with a propensity for local destruction and recurrence.
benignity of age," "divine spotlessness and power," and "the dignity of a thousand monarchs" (Melville 204-07).
The key to New York's relative environmental benignity is its extreme compactness.
Using the Stavros criteria, a set of criteria used to assess solid, nonpalpable breast masses, a radiologist can obtain greater than 95% specificity for benignity, eliminating the need for biopsy (5).
The references to Heaney in his work may remind us how incapable Muldoon is of drawing on his childhood as the source of benignity and beneficence as Heaney does again and again (even if one of the things that 'Clearances' makes clear is that the relationship with the mother was not an entirely straightforward one in his case either).
Your Memorialists humbly beseech your Lordship's Favor in this Instance, and implore that through your Lordship's Benignity and Justice, they may obtain Relief from Oppression.
for the first time in the worlds history, that Ladies may well step out of the circle which hitherto has ennarrowed their sphere of action in administrative functions for charity, that the exercise of their benignity need not be limited to the touching local displays which we have so long everywhere witnessed .