benign


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Related to benign: benign neglect, benign hypertension

benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

/be·nign/ (bĕ-nīn´) not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

[binīn′]
Etymology: L, benignus, kind
(of a tumor) noncancerous and therefore not a direct threat to life, even though treatment eventually may be required for health or cosmetic reasons. See also benign neoplasm. Compare malignant.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

benign

non-malignant, non-invasive and non-threatening

benign,

adj noncancerous; descriptive term for tumors, moles, and growths.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign (bēnīn´),

adj a condition that, untreated or with symptomatic therapy, will not become life threatening. It is used particularly in relation to tumors, which may be benign or malignant. They do not invade surrounding tissues and do not metastasize to other parts of the body. The word is slightly imprecise, as some can, due to mass effect, cause life-threatening complications.

benign

not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign enzootic paresis
see porcine viral encephalomyelitis.
benign fibrillators
horses with a history of poor performance in races which suffer an attack of atrial fibrillation during or immediately after a race which soon recovers spontaneously so that the abnormality often goes undetected.
benign footrot
occurs under very wet conditions. Caused by Dichelobacter nodosus of low virulence. There is dermatitis of the interdigital skin and minimal underrunning of horn at the heel. See also interdigital dermatitis.
References in classic literature ?
His countenance had resumed its usual benign expression, ere he concluded.
But more than these, there were half a dozen lions from London--authors, real authors, who had written whole books, and printed them afterwards--and here you might see 'em, walking about, like ordinary men, smiling, and talking--aye, and talking pretty considerable nonsense too, no doubt with the benign intention of rendering themselves intelligible to the common people about them.
By tracing the genetic changes that take place over time in the development of the disease, the research reaffirms the role of sun exposure in the emergence of precursor lesions, such as the common moles known as nevi, but also suggests that continued ultraviolet radiation (UV) damage to benign precursor lesions may push them on a path toward malignancy.
In 2 years, just 2 of the 48 patients at Rush continued to have benign hallucinations without requiring either a decrease in their dose of dopaminergic medications or an addition of neuroleptic agents to counteract the hallucinations or progressing to more serious hallucinations with loss of insight (UPDRS Thought Disorder score of 3) or delusions (UPDRS Thought Disorder score of 4).
5 cm, with benign histologic appearance and areas of cellularity and necrosis.
About one in five women develop benign breast disease at some time during their life.
104), other species of benign bacteria could be reintroduced at the same time.
What to do: Men who take saw palmetto for a benign enlarged prostate shouldn't expect much improvement (or side effects, which were no more common in the palmetto takers than in the placebo takers).
The Mayo Clinic's prospective studies of benign breast disease are funded by the Department of Defense.
has filed a patent application for both the pharmaceutical composition of TamoGel(tm) (4-hydroxytamoxifen gel) and the gel's use for the treatment of benign breast disease.
ASCEND Therapeutics (Herndon, VA) announced that it has filed a patent application for both the pharmaceutical composition of TamoGel (4-hydroxytamoxifen gel) and the gel's use for the treatment of benign breast disease.
For example, zinc [with no added mercury] is more benign than heavy metals used in some types of batteries.