benefit-cost ratio


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benefit-cost ratio

the ratio of the net present values of measurable benefits to costs. Used in benefit-cost analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Newly-appointed Mr Johnson appeared before the Westminster's Welsh Affairs committee and was challenged that the benefit-cost ratio of 1.
The 2017 reform legislation mandates that all small airports that meet a valid benefit-cost ratio requirement will retain or get qualified for a small tower.
Of the 73 rulemakings examined, 34 (46%) improved their benefit-cost ratio from the proposed to final versions.
Moreover, it aimed to determine the volume of ash residue, boiling rate, heating value, burning efficiency and burning rate of the coconut leaf midrib charcoal then compare it to coconut shell charcoal and verify its benefit-cost ratio.
The data presented indicated that wheat crop sown with turbo seeder in standing stubbles of rice crop combine harvested at 45 cm height showed the maximum benefit-cost ratio followed by 60 cm stubble height under same no-till technique.
Senator John Hoeven, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, today pressed Mick Mulvaney, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), to ensure that OMB accounts for innovative funding methods, like public-private partnerships (P3), when calculating the benefit-cost ratio of Army Corps of Engineer projects.
Benefit-Cost Ratio is the ratio of total revenue with total cost and shows the return received on the costs of one rupee.
Consequently, resulting benefit-cost ratio estimates vary widely.
As a result of drastic audit reforms, there has been substantial increase in recoveries, with a phenomenal increase in benefit-cost ratio of 28:1 in 2015-16.
The participants appreciated the initiatives taken by the department to improve auditing, particularly its achievement of a record benefit-cost ratio of Rs28 for each Rs1 spent on auditing.
Although Congress has authorized building a second Poe-sized lock, the project has not advanced because of a "flawed study" putting its benefit-cost ratio below 1.