benefit-cost analysis


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Related to benefit-cost analysis: opportunity cost

benefit-cost analysis

a technique of economic evaluation, particularly for complex projects over a long period of time and involving substantial capital, that takes into account social costs and benefits as well as financial considerations.
References in periodicals archive ?
These institutional changes and their related consequences are not easy to analyze, but are critical in doing a good benefit-cost analysis.
RESPONDING TO COMMENTARY ON THE BENEFITS AND COSTS OF BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS
The benefit-cost analysis (BCA) of the structural modification involved estimating the monetary value of the benefits, measured in terns saved by reduced road-kills at bridge sites, versus the costs of making structural (i.
By examining the steps in a benefit-cost analysis for Lambert-St.
Zerbe makes a convincing argument that perceived ownership should be entailed in benefit-cost analysis.
C (Dallas-Forth Worth) helps illustrate the need for benefit-cost analysis.
In the sections that follow, I discuss Viscusi's implicit assumption that promotion of economic efficiency is the only legitimate social goal of punitive damages, comment on the nature and strength of his historical evidence that punitive damages are often assessed because companies perform risk or benefit-cost analysis, sketch a theory of why the threat of such assessments is likely to deter socially worthwhile analysis in many cases, and comment on potential policy responses.
Ideally, benefit-cost analysis provides an analytical framework for weighing in economic terms the trade-offs involved in policies that affect the environment and human health.
A benefit-cost analysis is a tool for determining how economically-efficient a program is - whether that program generates social benefits in excess of social costs.
The subsequent chapters present the details of the project cycle and they use standard benefit-cost analysis methodology.
Successful applications of benefit-cost analysis to other educational and social service programs can also be found in the broader literature (see, for example, Kemper, Long, & Thornton, 1981; Psacharopoulos & Woodhall, 1985; Thompson, 1980; Weber, Foster, & Weikert, 1978; and Weisbrod, 1981).
Methodological Frameworks for Regulatory Impact Analysis - Valuation, Risk and Benefit-Cost Analysis