beneficence

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beneficence

 [bĕ-nef´ĭ-sens]
the doing of active goodness, kindness, or charity, including all actions intended to benefit others. It is contrasted to benevolence, which refers to the character trait or moral virtue of being disposed to act for the benefit of others. In bioethics, the principle of beneficence refers to a moral obligation to act for the benefit of others. Not all acts of beneficence are obligatory, but a principle of beneficence asserts an obligation to help others further their interests. Obligations to confer benefits, to prevent and remove harms, and to weigh and balance the possible goods against the costs and possible harms of an action are central to bioethics.

Beneficence may be considered to include four components: (1) one ought not to inflict evil or harm (sometimes called the principle of nonmaleficence); (2) one ought to prevent evil or harm; (3) one ought to remove evil or harm; and (4) one ought to do or promote good.

ben·e·fi·cence

(be-nef'ĭ-sens),
The ethical principle of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

ben·e·fi·cence

(bĕ-nef'i-sĕns)
The habit, intention, or practice of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

beneficence (b·neˑ·fi·sns),

n a principle of medical ethics according to which a person should do good to others, especially when one has a professional duty to do so.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have vowed a fast unto the Beneficent, and may not speak this day to any mortal.
Beneficent belongs to the realism period, during which he painted scenes of everyday life expanding the concept of human activity to human-centricity.
Cuoi Under the Banyan Tree and The Jade Rabbit are both stories built around the features and aspects of the moon, and perhaps beneficent influences for children in the world, personified by features of the moon.
The very trees around him, covered with snow, take on the appearance of giant white beneficent protectors.
He held an MBA from Columbia Business School, and he earned his undergraduate degree at Brown University, where an active role in his fraternity foreshadowed his later dedication to social and beneficent organizations.
Devil's advocate: an argument for why Israel is a beneficent peacemaker.
On the contrary, even such revolutionary discoveries as are here projected would still be science, therefore susceptible, like all scientific endeavor, to beneficent application--but also to ultimate desecration
The Universal Beneficent Society, who help elderly people on low incomes, and Lifecare, who provide care services for pensioners, will also receive a share.
And the company, like a beneficent scrim of blackened sky, pure
If it's all 'on the house', perhaps the apparently selfless and beneficent Chinese might also consider paying some financial compensation to all the owners of the 98 per cent of the 486,000 English homes now blighted by being within a kilometre of HS2's 225mph trains every three minutes.
In the Name of Allah, The most beneficent, the most merciful, we inaugurate the third ordinary session of the 15th legislative chapter of your esteemed council, appreciating your truthful efforts and your cooperation with the government in UAE's march toward achieving success, which was laid down by the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan and the his brothers the Founding Fathers and which has been sincerely driven by the nation's sons and daughters in different fields at different levels.
He said that pacifying FATA through dialogue will ultimately beneficent for everybody so facilitating talks with the Taliban will be in the interest of not only Pakistan but also the whole region as stable Pakistan means stable region.