beneficence

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beneficence

 [bĕ-nef´ĭ-sens]
the doing of active goodness, kindness, or charity, including all actions intended to benefit others. It is contrasted to benevolence, which refers to the character trait or moral virtue of being disposed to act for the benefit of others. In bioethics, the principle of beneficence refers to a moral obligation to act for the benefit of others. Not all acts of beneficence are obligatory, but a principle of beneficence asserts an obligation to help others further their interests. Obligations to confer benefits, to prevent and remove harms, and to weigh and balance the possible goods against the costs and possible harms of an action are central to bioethics.

Beneficence may be considered to include four components: (1) one ought not to inflict evil or harm (sometimes called the principle of nonmaleficence); (2) one ought to prevent evil or harm; (3) one ought to remove evil or harm; and (4) one ought to do or promote good.

ben·e·fi·cence

(be-nef'ĭ-sens),
The ethical principle of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

ben·e·fi·cence

(bĕ-nef'i-sĕns)
The habit, intention, or practice of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

beneficence (b·neˑ·fi·sns),

n a principle of medical ethics according to which a person should do good to others, especially when one has a professional duty to do so.
References in classic literature ?
It was visible in the calm and well-considered beneficence of his daily life, the quiet stream of which had made a wide green margin all along its course.
And then, as I walked fast along the road, there rose upon me a strange, inly-felt idea of some Great Being, unseen, but all present, who in His beneficence desired only my welfare, and now watched the struggle of good sad evil in my heart, and waited to see whether I should obey His voice, heard in the whispers of my conscience, or lend an ear to the sophisms by which His enemy and mine--the Spirit of Evil --sought to lead me astray.
At the last it fell; and, where it touched earth, there broke out a stream which presently became a River, whose nature, by our Lord's beneficence, and that merit He acquired ere He freed himself, is that whoso bathes in it washes away all taint and speckle of sin.
There was no more heavy beneficence, no more attempts to dignify the situation with poetry or the Scriptures.