bending fracture

bend·ing frac·ture

an injury in which a long bone or bones, usually the radius and ulna, are bent (that is, angulated) due to multiple microfractures, none of which can be seen by x-ray imaging.

bending fracture

1 a fracture indirectly caused by the bending of an extremity, such as the foot or the big toe.
2 a deformity of a long bone caused by multiple small fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The method developed in this study by which bending fracture tests were coupled to AE techniques provided helpful results to understand in great detail the failure mechanisms of tool steels under such applied loading, as well as the interaction of their microstructural constituents.
As a result of a simple calculus, one could determine the energy necessary for the delamination, bending fracture, respectively penetration of the bullet, by using the following relations:
Unlike the first two situations, when delamination and bending fracture of the test bar depend on the relative values of [tau], respectively [sigma] and on the l/h ratio, in the latter case, the bullet will penetrate or not, according to the incidental energy and the bullet's dimensions.
A simple calculus can determine the necessary energy for: delamination, bending fracture, bullet penetration.
This action tends to cause crushing of the tenon on its inside edge and a bending fracture on its outside edge at its point of entry into the bottom face of the rafter.
The flake produced by a bending fracture tears away from the core behind the point of impact, whereas on a conchoidally produced flake, the platform lies between the point of impact and the dorsal surface of the flake.
they may be seen on flakes initiated by either Hertzian or bending fractures.
An examination of the debris on my own knapping floor suggests that waisting is not necessarily diagnostic of flakes initiated by bending fractures and, like the waisting on the conchoidally flaked piece in Fig.
In order to fully understand the bending fracture behavior and monitor micro-damage evolution under long-term evaluation (e.
The final bending fracture as indicated by white arrow in Fig.
2) Internal fixation of metaphyseal bending fractures has become increasingly popular due primarily to (a) directly control and maintain physiologic palmar tilt, (b) prevent collapse with external fixation, and (c) avoid bridging the radiocarpal joint.
Most bending fractures occurred in young men (20-30 yrs) and the torsion fractures affected men and women of about 40 equally.