bellow


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bellow

one of the voices of cattle. Usually refers to the arrogant call of the bull used to announce territorial rights. Abnormalities of the voice include hoarseness as in rabies, or continuous repetition as in nervous acetonemia. See also low, moo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Bellow's writing reflects his Jewishness and makes important use of biblical references, Siegel rejects all attempts to present Bellow as the "gold standard" for Jewish American writing or to squeeze him into a literary triad with Roth and Malamud.
Bellow lived all over the place--Chicago, New York City, Mexico, Minneapolis, Paris, Italy, New Haven, the Hudson River Valley, San Juan--had numerous close relations and friends, most for life, and wrote six novels, many short stories, and a play during the period covered by Leader's book.
The company says a good example of this is its range of valves available in a bellows seal design, such as its Type 808 bellows sealed globe valve.
For Zachary Leader's life of Saul Bellow is not merely head and shoulders above its predecessors, but given the depth of his research and judgment and its broad scope, it is hard to imagine it being bettered anytime soon--about Bellow's first five decades, at any rate.
Mira esta imagen [1] y luego esta otra [2]: las fotografias de Saul Bellow (1915-2005) que adornan las primeras cubiertas de la edicion en la que Library of America reune sus obras completas.
Those words could have come right out of Augie March and tell us almost as much about Bellow as any book about his rise to fame and fortune.
Here is shown a simulation model of two-way bellow actuator created by authors in Matlab's Simulink environment (Fig.
Autonomous actuators, comprising 216 connected pneumatic bellows modules, are attached underneath the covering that forms the surface of the conveyor.
When Hillman told this story to Bellow in May 1988, the chemist at the center of the tale was dying of cancer.
Bellow was going through a divorce at the time and was not in the best of spirits, but he accepted the State Department grant because he thought the change of scenery would do him some good.
It is interesting to contemplate why it took such a long time--and a couple of false starts--to write a biography of the Jewish American novelist Saul Bellow (1915-2005).
IN A LITTLE ESSAY ABOUT MOZART THAT Saul Bellow wrote toward the end of his life, he expressed admiration for the prodigious composer's facility with melody and harmony, and marveled at the way the music "is given so readily, easily, gratuitously.