bell jar


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bell jar

A glass vessel with an opening at only one end.
See also: jar
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Such is the case of Kate Baldwin, who remarks that in most appraisals of The Bell Jar certain aspects "have been partially obliterated by the seductiveness of Esther's solipsism" (2004, 23).
Some critics, like Susan Coyle in "Images of Madness and Retrieval: An Exploration of Metaphor in The Bell Jar," see the passage as a metaphor for Esther's psychological deterioration; Coyle notes that Esther is "'starving' not simply from indecision but also from an increasing sense of alienation from self and alienation from the world and her potential goals" (1984, 165).
After Sylvia Plath's publication of The Bell Jar by a British press and her subsequent death in 1963, American publishers and writers began to hear of the books success and soon sought to publish it--despite Mrs.
On the last day of shooting they gave me a copy of The Bell Jar and after I read it I thought she was fantastic and I became very interested in her writing.
Her autobiographical novel "The Bell Jar," about a young woman's mental breakdown, further pegged Plath as a tortured genius.
Geographical and political isolation insured that Asmara, capital of independent Eritrea, was a bit of a bell jar, preserving some of the best examples of Fascist architecture, in addition to Novecento, neoclassical, neo-Baroque and futurist styles.
Such studies have been carried out on The Bell Jar and the fiction of Flannery O'Connor with productive results.
Scholars pontificate upon Sylvia Plath's, The Bell Jar, Edvard Munch's "The Scream," and even Hendrix's "Manic Depression," but how many art historians peruse Norman Rockwell's "Boy Scouts' Calendar"?
In the eloquent tradition of The Bell Jar and I Never Promised You a Rose Garden comes this haunting book, inspired by the true story of the author's life.
Friends have criticised the decision to locate the plaque at the house Plath shared with Hughes, rather than in Fitzroy Road, where she wrote The Bell Jar and other key works after their separation.
This particular one is not peculiar because of a fetishistic interest in cannibalism or any other weird and wonderful obsession but rather because, while addressing a purportedly anthropological topic, it is in fact complete uninformed by contemporary anthropological knowledge and seems to exist in its own cultural bell jar.