bell-shaped curve

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bell-shaped curve

the curve of the probability density function of the normal distribution, resembling the outline of a bell. Also called normal curve.

gaus·si·an dis·tri·bu·tion

(gow'sē-ăn dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
The statistical distribution of members of a population around the population mean. In a gaussian distribution, 68.2% of values fall within ± 1 standard deviation (SD); 95.4% fall within ± 2 SD of the mean; and 99.7% fall within ± 3 SD of the mean.
Synonym(s): bell-shaped curve, normal distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is because markets are social beasts unto themselves and the crowd behavior of 100 or 1 million investors and traders can create randomness that makes bell curves much more flat and wide.
One wonders if Murray has the IQ to understand why that one sentence from Einstein is more important than every thing in The Bell Curve.
One thing seems clear: Wherever you fall on IQ's bell curve, it helps to have a high MQ.
The Bell Curve by Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein now joins this long tradition of grounding substantial inequalities in a nature which is beyond our control.
Tick season peaks at the height of summer's heat, and the incidence of tick-borne disease follows a similar bell curve that spikes in summer months.
The letters show the trajectory of his educational career and document his exchanges with such figures as Milton Friedman, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas (who was deeply influenced by Sowell's Race and Economics), Bell Curve author Charles Murray, and Condoleeza Rice.
The San Fernando Valley's residential real estate market is off to its best start in 13 years, and price-wise, it resembles a classic bell curve.
On the face of it, the pairing of evolution and literature seems likely to produce some sort of Frankenstein monster: freakish at best (The Naked Ape meets The Hairy Ape) and disturbing at worst (The Bell Curve meets The Bell Jar).
The Bell Curve (1994, Free Press, New York), the most successful (and controversial) literary lionization of quick-wittedness to date, drives home a related point: Intelligent is as intelligent does -- on an IQ test.
The Bell Curve could be read, in fact, as a response to that challenge.
Bellow's future projects include The Bell Curve by Richard J.
The ten decile points represent the entire bell curve of the industry, so it becomes possible to more precisely benchmark a target company against industry norms.