behaviourism

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Related to behaviouristic: behaviorist, behaviorism, behaviourism

behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.

be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.

behaviourism

an approach to psychology which studies and interprets behaviour by objective observation of that behaviour without regard to any subjective mental processes such as ideas, emotions and will. Instead, all behaviour is held to be governed by conditioned responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subjective disturbances of the employees working in manual toll collection are related to the occurrence or change of the concrete factors in the working and/or traffic environment, which is the principle of modern conceptual ergonomics due to equal recognition of the cognitive and behaviouristic principle of research.
This approach incorporates explicit reference to underlying skills and competencies and integrates learning objects into an originally behaviouristic formal psychological theory with its focus on knowledge assessment.
Within the science of education similar research has, for quite some time, been criticised for a number of reasons: an ideological base, assumptions of a simple and direct relation between teaching and learning, a subjectivistic or behaviouristic model of explanation and the absence of lasting insights on the efficiency wanted (see for instance Callewaert & Lundgren, 1976).