behaviourism


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Related to behaviourism: Cognitivism

behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.

be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.

behaviourism

an approach to psychology which studies and interprets behaviour by objective observation of that behaviour without regard to any subjective mental processes such as ideas, emotions and will. Instead, all behaviour is held to be governed by conditioned responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experimentation in psychology in the middle of the 20th century led to the behaviourism movement.
As a result of these and other failings, applied linguists departed from audiolingualism behaviourism and adopted a proto-constructivism approach (Cobb, 2005, p.
Mills astutely uncovers the influence of this unnamed behaviourism on realist turn in American philosophy.
Other early forms of behaviourism anticipating, and in many ways Surpassing in philosophical sophistication, J.
In fact Mills traces Watson's formulation of behaviourism to his Collaboration with Adolf Meyer, the prominent psychoanalytically-oriented psychiatrist, who shared Watson's vision of psychology as a rigorously experimental, unified, and, above all, useful science.
Behaviourism today is associated with the name of B.
Whilst behaviourists like Skinner and Watson worked in the fields of psychology and psychiatry, they wanted behaviourism to be the basis for managing and shaping the behaviour of patients, employees, students, trainees and whole societies.