behaviour therapy


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behaviour therapy

Any therapy which focuses on modifying observable and, in principle, quantifiable behaviour by systematic manipulation of the environment and variables functionally linked to the behaviour.
 
Examples
Operant conditioning, shaping, token economy, systematic desensitisation, aversion therapy, flooding.

behaviour therapy

A method of treating neurotic disorders and modifying unacceptable patterns of behaviour by establishing CONDITIONED REFLEXES, using positive and negative reinforcement, by reward and punishment, respectively. Behaviour therapy has been shown to be effective in obsessive-compulsive disorders, phobias, sexual dysfunction, aggressive conduct in SCHIZOPHRENIA and in some cases of so-called MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS. In general, it is more useful in treating circumscribed conditions than in dealing with widespread personality disorders.

behaviour therapy

form of psychotherapy designed to change maladaptive behaviour patterns using the principles of classical and operant conditioning. Also known as behaviour modification.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chapter broadly chronicles the evolution of behaviour therapy from early 1900s till date.
Chapter 2 of part I has extensively dealt with basic concepts for understanding behaviour therapy.
The Chapter on Psychobiological Basis of Behaviour Therapy highlighted the symbiotic relationship between physiological and psychological aspects as the scientific basis for behaviour therapy.
The author while discussing Developmental Perspectives in behaviour therapy has cautioned the practitioners to take extra care in applying behaviour therapy on children.
Part II of the book extensively deals with the techniques of behaviour therapy in eight separate sections.
The section on Techniques of Behaviour Therapy, in fact, serves as a handbook for practitioners as well as aspirants in the field of behaviour therapy.
In line with overseas trends, cognitive behaviour therapy was also readily accepted in Aotearoa/ New Zealand among psychological practitioners and consumers (Kazantzis & Deane,1998; Koong Hean Foo & Merrick, 2004).
It is derived from cognitive psychology and behaviour therapy in terms of the development of concepts of schema and cognitive belief.
As a consequence of drawing on elements from various therapeutic modalities, cognitive behaviour therapy has nevertheless become quite adaptable to different environments.
For instance, in a search of cognitive behaviour therapy literature from 1967 to 2003, Butler, Chapman, Foreman, & Beck (2006) found 15 methodologically sound meta-analyses covering 9138 participants and 332 studies.
The values inherent in Beck's approach to therapy contained in the term 'Collaborative Empiricism' are also a likely cause of the popular acceptance of cognitive behaviour therapy.
The research team from Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada has shown that a combination of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and the medication zolpidem for 6 weeks was associated with improvement in sleep.

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