behaviour


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Related to behaviour: behavior, behaviour management

behaviour

(bĭ-hāv′yər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of behavior.

behaviour

See behavior.

behaviour

Conduct, bearing, demeanor, manner.
 
Lab medicine
The changes in properties of a substance in response to environmental factors.

Psychology
Manner of behaving (e.g., good or bad); mode of conduct; comportment.

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yŏr)
1. Any response emitted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Parts of a total response pattern.
Synonym(s): behaviour.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

behaviour

  1. the total activities of a living organism (usually an animal) ranging from simple movement to complex patterns involved with courtship, threat, camouflage, etc.
  2. the observable response of an organism to stimuli from the environment. See INSTINCT, LEARNING.

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yŏr)
1. Any response emit-ted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Specifically, parts of a total response pattern.
Synonym(s): behaviour.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]
References in classic literature ?
Would he thank you, either on his own account or Miss Thorpe's, for supposing that her affection, or at least her good behaviour, is only to be secured by her seeing nothing of Captain Tilney?
Her resolution was supported by Isabella's behaviour in their parting interview.
I detest such creatures; and it would be much better for them that their faces had been seamed with the smallpox; but I must confess, I never saw any of this wanton behaviour in poor Jenny: some artful villain, I am convinced, hath betrayed, nay perhaps forced her; and I pity the poor wretch with all my heart.
It has seemed to the behaviourists that similar methods can be applied to human behaviour, without assuming anything not open to external observation.
Thus what is called "knowing," in the sense in which we can ascertain what other people "know," is a phenomenon exemplified in their physical behaviour, including spoken and written words.
In all this we have characteristic differences between the behaviour of animals and the behaviour of matter as studied by physics.
I believe--as I shall try to prove in a later lecture -that desire, like force in mechanics, is of the nature of a convenient fiction for describing shortly certain laws of behaviour.
I say only that the study of the behaviour of living bodies, in the present state of our knowledge, is distinct from physics.
I believe an "unconscious" desire is merely a causal law of our behaviour,* namely, that we remain restlessly active until a certain state of affairs is realized, when we achieve temporary equilibrium If we know beforehand what this state of affairs is, our desire is conscious; if not, unconscious.