behavioral medicine


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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

be·hav·ior·al med·i·cine

an interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science knowledge and techniques relevant to health and illness, and to its application to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.

behavioral medicine

n.
The prevention and treatment of illness by the application of psychological and behavioral therapies such as behavior modification, biofeedback, relaxation training, and hypnosis.

behavioral medicine

a segment of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.

behavioral medicine

A medical discipline that integrates behavioral, psychosocial, and biomedical approaches to improving health and reducing illness. See Mind/body medicine.

be·hav·ior·al med·i·cine

(bē-hāvyŏr-ăl medi-sin)
Interdisciplinary field concerned with development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science concepts and techniques relevant to health and illness.

be·hav·ior·al med·i·cine

(bē-hāvyŏr-ăl medi-sin)
Interdisciplinary field concerned with development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science knowledge and techniques relevant to health and illness, and to its application to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.

behavioral medicine,

n a branch of clinical psychology that deals with behavior modification and may involve assertiveness training, aversion therapy, contingency management, operant conditioning, and systemic desensitization.
References in periodicals archive ?
BHPs also appear to be suboptimally engaged in addressing behavioral medicine concerns in favor of focusing on mental health concerns, such as depression.
The future of cognitive behavioral interventions within behavioral medicine.
Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, U.
One trend contributing to the rise of behavioral medicine is what I call "the democratization of psychiatry.
is a clinical psychologist and Director of the Behavioral Medicine Clinic of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst Health Services.
During her 2 years of residency in veterinary behavioral medicine at Texas A&M University's College of Veterinary Medicine in College Station, she has diagnosed the disorder only once, in a female terrier.
Rona Smyth Henry, MBA, MPH is Associate Director of Partners in Caregiving: The Dementia Services Program, based in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
In: The Comprehensive Handbook of Behavioral Medicine, vol.
PhD, director of psychological services and behavioral medicine, the Homewood Hospital Center, Johns Hopkins Health System, Baltimore and Kenneth J.
Borgess has a one of a kind comprehensive behavioral medicine program that ranks number one in behavioral medicine admits in southwest Michigan.
OMSB, represented by the Behavioral Medicine Program, presented a research by Dr.
The book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students of psychology, physiology, behavioral medicine, anthropology, nursing, the neurosciences, and related fields.

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