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bear

(bâr)
n.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
(1) A subculture in gay/bisexual male communities with events, codes and culture-specific identity that hinge around a hypermasculine identity
(2) A member of a subculture of gay/bisexual males who is hairy and often bearded. Some bears have embraced transgendered as well as non-gendered individuals

bear

see ursus, brunus edwardii and koala. Species of less legitimate lineage include Pooh, Paddington and Brideshead bears.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne says that although his decision to seek protection for polar bears acknowledged the melting of the Arctic ice, his department was not taking a position on why the ice was melting or what to do about it.
Why was it now declaring that global warming is not only real but killing polar bears ?
This bear is considered a no-harm, no-foul bear,'' said Troy Swauger, spokesman for the California Department of Fish and Game.
In North America, hunters kill American black bears and sell the gallbladders illegally.
There are now even bear subsections, like cubs (the category with the most controversial definition, though it generally indicates smaller, often younger men), grizzlies (extra-large, extra-hairy guys), daddy bears (bears who are either mature or dominant), and polar bears (silver haired seniors), among others.
A historic agreement reached this April between Canadian environmental groups and Canada's logging industry will ensure the long-term security of British Columbia's threatened west coast Great Bear Rainforest.
The nearby 19,212-acre Big Lake Wildlife Management Area provides additional habitat for roving bears.
The studies showed that relocated bears would either return to the original location, die in their new surroundings or become a problem in the new location.
On the day of the incident, a pair of two-year-old twins, Cleo and Charles, and their three-year-old sister, Brooklyn, were playing in the backyard when Brooklyn spotted a bear running toward the house.
In October, city arts coordinator Michael Marks and a white acrylic grizzly bear sculpture took a booth at the League of California Cities conference at the Moscone Center, where the curious stopped by to see what they thought was a polar bear.
There's an artistic lore built up on attracting bears with scents," says Proctor.
In the past, nuisance bears were moved two or three times in an effort to break their garbage-eating habits.