bear

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bear

(bâr)
n.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
(1) A subculture in gay/bisexual male communities with events, codes and culture-specific identity that hinge around a hypermasculine identity
(2) A member of a subculture of gay/bisexual males who is hairy and often bearded. Some bears have embraced transgendered as well as non-gendered individuals

bear

see ursus, brunus edwardii and koala. Species of less legitimate lineage include Pooh, Paddington and Brideshead bears.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the exegetical category of "promise" presupposes the hiddenness of God--even within God's revelation to human beings--to which the biblical texts bear witness in diverse ways, it can provide means for avoiding the injustices of hegemonic interpretation and for bearing witness to the God whose promises are simultaneously mysterious and sure.
September 11: Bearing Witness to History, Japanese American National Museum, through Aug.
But if he tended to fall off the po-mo maps of the '80s, he would later offer a whole style of thinking that did not suffer the fate of the unhappy critic bravely bearing witness to his own demise.
The problem is that by saying nothing, by refusing to take the risk of coming out and bearing witness to the reality of their lives, they are adding to the impression that they are all somehow shameful and guilty, denying us the witnesses we need and powerfully undermining both their own cause and the cause of gay liberation.
Somewhere in the expanse of our lives, close enough to call home, these stories are remembered by someone bearing witness.
In the Anglican Church of Canada, advocacy has largely taken the form of bearing witness to governments and other leaders, expressing publicly the call of our faith to peace with justice.
For example, her arguments about bearing witness could have been condensed at various points (for instance, on pages 191-93, her repeated mentioning of atrocity photos as "acts of bearing witness," as upholding "the centrality of bearing witness," and as "tools of bearing witness" is simply redundant).