bear

(redirected from bear fruit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

bear

(bâr)
n.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
(1) A subculture in gay/bisexual male communities with events, codes and culture-specific identity that hinge around a hypermasculine identity
(2) A member of a subculture of gay/bisexual males who is hairy and often bearded. Some bears have embraced transgendered as well as non-gendered individuals

bear

see ursus, brunus edwardii and koala. Species of less legitimate lineage include Pooh, Paddington and Brideshead bears.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is to trust that if we live our life doing good and showing mercy or compassion, it 'will always bear fruit and will someday return to benefit you.
In this way, the Fellows program, if successful, will grow high-potential saplings into strong, tall trees that bear fruit into perpetuity.
We hope their reconciliation and reintegration efforts would bear fruit but we stand ready to continue to assist them in their efforts against the Taliban, the havoc they cause and the way they threaten innocent Afghans,'' she said.
We've learned some heavy lessons along the way, but all that hard work is starting to bear fruit.
President Barack Obama said that negotiations between Turkey and Armenia could bear fruit very quickly.
Although the fruit won't grow into bananas you see in shops, it is still unusual for the trees to bear fruit in this country.
A treasure is entrusted, talents are offered, which ought to be accepted with responsibility so that they may bear fruit in abundance.
This is one of the areas that SEA has been emphasizing and the centre is starting to bear fruit.
Second, the establishment should say, "How can we help you bear fruit within your new ecclesiastical arrangements?
Foss emphasizes that our efforts need to bear fruit and challenges the oft-used maxim "God doesn't call [one] to be successful; God only calls [one] to be faithful.
He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful.
Staller's impact on the lives of FFA members will bear fruit for generations.