bay

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bay

(),
1. In anatomy, a recess containing fluid.
2. Especially, the lacrimal bay.

bay

an anatomical depression or recess, usually containing fluid, such as the lacrimal bay of the eye.

bay

()
(Laurus nobilis) Available as a berry, leaves, oils, and extract; clinical studies suggest value as an antiulcerative in laboratory animals and in gastrointestinal disease; purported uses include as an antirheumatic, diuretic, and antiseptic.
Synonym(s): sweet bay.

bay,

n Latin name:
Laurus nobilis; parts used: berries, leaves, oil; uses: antidiabetic, antiulcerogenic, rubefacient, rheumatism, colic, antispasmodic, cirrhosis; oil: antibacterial, antifungal; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, asthma, insulin, antidiabetic medications. Also called
bay laurel, bay leaf, bay tree, laurel, sweet bay, or
Roman laurel.

bay

()
In anatomy, a recess containing fluid, but especially, the lacrimal bay.

bay

1. a tan or red-brown coat color of horses. Light bay is light tan; mealy bay is a redder but lighter, rust color; blood bay is a much deeper, redder color; golden bay has a tinge of yellow in a deep red-brown color.
2. prolonged bark or howl of a hunting hound.
References in periodicals archive ?
By autumn, the bay tree had grown well over a foot with multiple branches.
Peppers Tomatoes Courgettes Bay tree Asparagus Herbs You don't need a big garden to grow a selection of herbs
uk website has unveiled its latest product, a living bay tree decorated with traditional hand-tied dried oranges and limes.
Bay sucker leaves bay trees looking really awful; hand-pick the obviously infected leaves and destroy them.
Finishing touches were added for that "wow" factor: brass door furniture, pots and bay trees in a low-maintenance aggregate garden enhance the Victorian house and give a great first impression.
Take bay trees grown in pots inside if cold weather is predicted, or move them under a porch or to the most sheltered part of the garden to protect the leaves.
Look closely and you'll find dahlias, sweet peas and bay trees adding height and structure to the display.