battle injury


Also found in: Acronyms.

battle injury

A term for wounds received in combat, either from to enemy or friendly. Accidental wounds, though received in battle, are not regarded as battle injuries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the fatality rate, the hospitalization rate for DNBI in World War II was still much higher (669/1,000 person-years [p-years]) than the rate for battle injury (29/1,000 p-years), due primarily to disease (592/1,000 p-years).
In this rapidly changing operational setting, every casualty, whether from battle injury or DNBI, will impact unit and mission readiness.
Medical evacuation rates in OEF for disease, nonbattle injury, and battle injury were 28.
Figures 1A and 1B show the monthly rates for DNBI (blue line) and battle injury (red line) medical evacuations from OEF and OIF-OND, respectively.
The 2 leading diagnosis categories for OEF and OIF-OND were nonbattle injury (ie, acute injuries and injury-related musculoskeletal conditions) accounting for 31% and 34%, respectively, of medical evacuations, and battle injury, accounting for 20% and 16%, respectively, of evacuations.
The percentage of battle injury evacuations in OEF increased starting in 2006, whereas the battle injury percentage in OIF-OND was increasing from 2003 to 2007 and then dropped from 2008 to 2013.
Hospitalization rates for disease, nonbattle injury, and battle injury in OEF were 16.
For OEF and OIF-OND, the 4 leading diagnosis groups for hospitalizations were battle injury (36% and 21%, respectively), nonbattle injury (18% and 19%, respectively), digestive disorders (11% and 15%, respectively) and ill-defined conditions (10% for both operations).
The 3 leading diagnosis groups were nonbattle injury, battle injury, and behavioral health.

Full browser ?