battered woman


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battered woman

A woman who has been physically or sexually assaulted by her husband, partner, or former partner. Typically verbal abuse precedes physical violence. An escalating pattern of intimidation and injury often results, sometimes ending in death. Frequently women are reluctant to report this type of abuse because they feel trapped or isolated. Women from any socioeconomic level may be affected. Shelters and support for battered women are available in many locations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Downs quotes often from Dutton's 1992 Empowering and Healing the Battered Woman, but not from the sections in which Dutton explains her common grounds with Walker (the utility in some circumstances of the cycle-of-violence theory) as well as her points of departure (for instance, her discussion of the work of various researchers to reformulate "learned helplessness").
If you represent a battered woman who has fought back against her abuser, you should evaluate the benefits of going to the grand jury.
A battered woman defendant in an "imminent" jurisdiction is more likely than her counterpart in an "immediate" jurisdiction to get a jury instruction specifically on the relevance of the decendent's past violence.
9) The psychological theory is often credited to Lenore Walker, a clinical and forensic psychologist whose book, The Battered Woman Syndrome, coined the term.
For instance, in cases like Tancredi--where a judge intervenes to shelter a battered woman from what the judge perceives to be another cycle of control and domination-victim feedback might reveal these protective gestures to be appreciated by women who fear they could not personally resist their batterers without endangering themselves.
As Donileen Loseke demonstrates, analyzing what constitutes a "normal battered woman case" for workers from feminist organizations is critical for understanding the functioning of these organizations and for developing strategies for reform.
In leaving an abusive relationship, a battered woman must balance her own and her children's safety and needs, including considerations of economics (homelessness and joblessness), community and family resources, and the danger of her abuser's retaliation (Gelles, 1997).
The most dangerous time for a battered woman is after she leaves her abuser, because the abuser increases his or her use of violence in response to a perceived loss of control when a woman leaves (Jones, 1994).
This article examines the limitations of expert testimony in homicide cases in which women have asserted battered woman syndrome as a defense.
To which the equally earnest battered woman who, as is often the case, has suffered through years of horrific physical and emotional abuse and fear, responds: "And I want you to understand that what you are talking about is my life.
The reader is introduced to Camille, a loveless woman who was ignored by her mother and father as a child and is currently a battered woman escaping from a violent, seven-year relationship.
1) This Comment explores the role of preemptive strikes in the law of self-defense in three contexts: battered woman syndrome cases, prisoner on prisoner violence, and the so-called "cultural defense.