batrachotoxin


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Related to batrachotoxin: saxitoxin

ba·trach·o·tox·in

(ba-tra-kō-tok'sin),
A neurotoxin from the Colombian arrow poison frogs (Phyllobates spp.). It is nontoxic when ingested. If it is injected or if ulcers are present, it will cause an irreversible increase in permeability of sodium ions in nerve membrane, producing paralysis.
[G. batrachos, frog, + toxin]

batrachotoxin

(bə-trăk′ə-tŏk′sĭn, băt′rə-kō-)
n.
A steroid alkaloid derived from skin secretions of South American poison-dart frogs of the genus Phyllobates. It is one of the most potent venoms known.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The famous neurotoxin batrachotoxin 1 is a member of a family of steroidal alkaloids called batrachotoxins.
Batrachotoxin 1 tends to affect the nervous system by causing the irreversible opening of Na+ channels in the nerves causing a change in ion selectivity of the ion channel by increasing the permeability of the channel toward larger cations, which results in depolarization of nerves leading to failure of nerve impulse transmission [4].
carried out first total synthesis of batrachotoxinin A from Wieland-Miescher ketone by utilizing intramolecular furan Diels-Alder reaction and oxy-Michael reaction [10] The work presented here is a reflection of our strategy towards the synthesis of steroidal skeleton of batrachotoxin 1 by the application of radical mediated cascade cyclization.
The presented work highlights the attempts towards the synthesis of steroidal backbone of batrachotoxin 1.
These dendrobatid frogs are the origin of the batrachotoxins (BTXs)--batrachotoxin, homobatrachotoxin, and batrachotoxin-A.
The name batrachotoxin is derived from the Greek "batrachos," meaning frog.
Batrachotoxin blocks neuromuscular transmission irreversibly.
Some alkaloids, such as batrachotoxin, have helped neurobiologists study sodium channels -- molecular pores in nerve cell membranes that help control the excitation of nerve cells.
These beetles, each only about 7 millimeters long, live in the same regions as the birds do and carry batrachotoxins, Dumbacher and his colleagues report in the Nov.
The batrachotoxins are "very rare compounds, and they occur spottily in nature," he says.
and their colleagues figured out in 1992 that the birds carry steroids called batrachotoxins, which were first identified in the 1960s as poisons in some frog skins.
Batrachotoxins sabotage the sodium channels employed by nerve cells.