bath

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bath

 [bath]
1. a medium, e.g., water, vapor, sand, or mud, with which the body is washed or in which the body is wholly or partially immersed for therapeutic or cleansing purposes; application of such a medium to the body.
2. the equipment or apparatus in which a body or object may be immersed.
bed bath the cleansing of a patient in bed. A complete bed bath indicates that someone must totally wash a patient, as is done with an unconscious patient. A partial bed bath is one in which the patient is not totally dependent but is given a basin, soap, and water, as well as any assistance needed to maintain good hygiene.
bath blanket a flannel covering used to prevent chilling when administering a bed bath.
colloid bath a medicated bath prepared by adding soothing agents to the bath water such as gelatin, starch, or bran in order to relieve skin irritation and itching. The patient is dried by patting rather than rubbing the skin. Care must be taken to avoid chilling.
contrast bath alternate immersion of a part in hot water and cold water.
cool bath one in water from 18° to 24°C (65° to 75°F).
emollient bath a bath in a soothing and softening liquid, used in various skin disorders.
lukewarm bath warm bath.
oatmeal bath a colloid bath containing oatmeal, used for treatment of dermatoses to soothe the skin and relieve itching.
paraffin bath the dipping of a limb into a warm solution of paraffin, or the brushing of paraffin onto the skin, to provide pain relief and increase mobility.
sitz bath immersion of only the hips and buttocks, done to relieve pain and discomfort following rectal surgery, cystoscopy, or vaginal surgery; sitz baths also may be ordered for patients with cystitis or infections in the pelvic cavity. Temperature for a hot sitz bath is started at 35°C (95°F) and gradually increased to 40 to 43°C (104° to 110°F). The patient must be watched for fatigue and faintness, and an attendant must remain within calling distance. Cool compresses to the head or cool drinks during the bath promote comfort and relieve faintness.
Disposable sitz bath. From Lammon et al., 1995.
sponge bath one in which the patient's body is not immersed but is wiped with a wet cloth or sponge; this is most often done for reduction of body temperature in presence of fever, in which case the water used is cool.
tepid bath one in water 24° to 33°C (75° to 92°F).
warm bath one in water just under body temperature, 33° to 37°C (92° to 98°F).
whirlpool bath one in which the water is kept in constant motion by mechanical means and has a massaging action that can promote improved circulation and relaxation; often used in the treatment of soft tissue injuries and management of open wounds such as burns.

bath

(bath),
1. Immersion of the body or any of its parts in water or any other yielding or fluid medium, or application of such medium in any form to the body or any of its parts.
2. Apparatus used in giving a bath of any form, qualified according to the medium used, the temperature of the medium, the form in which the medium is applied, the medicament added to the medium, or according to the part bathed.
3. Fluid used for maintenance of metabolic activities or growth of living organisms, for example, cells derived from body tissue.
[A.S. baeth]

bath

(bath)
1. a medium, e.g., water, vapor, sand, or mud, with which the body is washed or in which the body is wholly or partially immersed for therapeutic or cleansing purposes; application of such a medium to the body.
2. the equipment or apparatus in which a body or object may be immersed.

colloid bath  one containing gelatin, starch, bran, or similar substances.
contrast bath  alternate immersion of a body part in hot and cold water.
emollient bath  one in an emollient liquid, e.g., a decoction of bran.
half bath  a bath of the hips and lower part of the body.
hip bath  sitz b.
sitz bath  immersion of only the hips and buttocks.
sponge bath  one in which the body is not immersed but is rubbed with a wet cloth or sponge.
whirlpool bath  one in which the water is kept in constant motion by mechanical means.

bath

Etymology: AS, baeth
(in the hospital) a cleansing procedure performed by or for patients, as needed for hygienic or therapeutic purposes, to help prevent infection, preserve the unbroken condition of the skin, stimulate circulation, promote oxygen intake, maintain muscle tone and joint mobility, and provide comfort.
method The bath may be a bed or tub bath, a shower, or a partial bath, depending on the patient's condition and preference and the room temperature. The bath period may be used to instruct the patient on hygienic measures, range-of-motion exercises, and general measures to promote skin health. Observations are made of the general cleanliness and odor of the patient's body; the color, dryness, turgor, and elasticity and integrity of the skin; and the condition of the hair, hands, joints, feet, fingernails, and toenails. Any discoloration, abrasion, rash, discharge, perineal or rectal irritation, clubbing of the digits, hair loss, or evidence of lice infestation is carefully noted. Mild soap and warm water are used for the bath, and a lanolin-based lotion may be used for an after-bath massage. The patient's hair is combed daily and shampooed as needed; fingernails and toenails are cleaned and trimmed whenever required. The diabetic client may require specialized care of the nails.
interventions The nurse gives the bed bath in a setting that provides privacy for the patient. Firm, gentle strokes are used to wash, dry, and massage the person; vigorous rubbing is avoided. The partial bath is given with the patient seated in or on the side of the bed or in a chair. Self-help is encouraged, and the procedure is completed as quickly as possible to prevent chilling. In preparation for a tub bath, the nurse checks the safety strips in the bottom of the tub and the water temperature and assists the patient into the tub. Precautions are taken to prevent chilling, and on completion of the bath the nurse may help the patient out of the tub. In preparation for a shower, the nurse explains the operation of the dials regulating water temperature and provides a bath mat.
outcome criteria A bath provides an opportunity to assess external signs of disease, effects of therapy, and signs of pressure ulcer development and supports the patient's sense of well-being and self-esteem.

bath

Alternative
A general term for the immersion of the body in water and varying other substances at various temperatures for varying periods of time.

Lab medicine
A receptacle containing water heated to a specific temperature.
 
Vox populi
(1) An exposure or immersion the body or body parts to water or vapour for cleanliness, comfort or health. For examples: cold or hot bath; medicated bath; steam bath; hip bath; to take a bath.
(2) A place or container wherein a person immerses him or herself in water, as in a bathtub.
(3) A building containing a suite/suites for bathing, as in a bathhouse.

bath

(bath)
1. Immersion of the body or any of its parts in water or any other yielding or fluid medium, or application of such medium in any form to the body or any of its parts. May be used for cleansing or therapy.
2. Apparatus used in giving a bath of any form.
3. Fluid used for maintenance of metabolic activities or growth of living organisms, e.g., cells derived from body tissue.
[A.S. baeth]

bath

1. a medium, e.g. water, vapor, sand or mud, with which the body is washed or in which the body is wholly or partially immersed for therapeutic or cleansing purposes; application of such a medium to the body.
2. the equipment or apparatus in which a body or object may be immersed.

colloid bath
a bath prepared by adding soothing agents, such as gelatin, starch, bran or similar substances, to the bath water, for the purpose of relieving skin irritation and pruritus. The patient is dried by patting rather than rubbing the skin. Care must be taken to avoid chilling.
contrast bath
alternate immersion of a part in hot water and cold water.
cool bath
one in water from 60 to 75°F (15 to 24°C).
emollient bath
a bath in a soothing and softening liquid, used in various skin disorders.
fish bath treatment
a separate tank prepared for this purpose is best. Is most effective as a means of treating skin conditions. There is insufficient absorption of most drugs from aquarium water.
hot bath
one in water from 98 to 112°F (36 to 44°C).
bath oil
a dispersible surfactant oil used in the treatment of dry skin disease, particularly seborrhea sicca.
tepid bath
one in water 85 to 92°F (30 to 33°C).
warm bath
one in water 90 to 104°F (32 to 40°C).
whirlpool bath
one in which the water is kept in constant motion by mechanical means. It has a gentle massaging action that promotes relaxation and is used in the treatment of skin diseases.
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