fermentation

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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

/fer·men·ta·tion/ (fer″men-ta´shun) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fermentation

[fur′məntā′shən]
Etymology: L, fermentare, to cause to rise
a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products. Kinds of fermentation are acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation, ammoniacal fermentation, amylic fermentation, butyric fermentation, caseous fermentation, dextran fermentation, diastatic fermentation, lactic acid fermentation, propionic fermentation, storing fermentation, and viscous fermentation.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation,

n a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products such as acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation.

fermentation

the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP. An essential part of the digestion that goes on in the rumen and in the colon and cecum of horses. Used commercially in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and the generation of by-products used as animal feed. Also the basic process in the manufacture of antibiotics.

batch fermentation
one of the methods used in the industrial production of microorganisms, where the sterile growth medium is inoculated with the microorganisms and no additional growth medium is added.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall results of cumulative methane production of pig manure and dairy cow manure using three different batch fermentation techniques were present in Figure 2, where they fit very well to the first-order kinetic curves as can be seen in Figure 3.
1] (VS), mean+SD) of inoculum, pig manure, cow manure and cellulose with different batch fermentation procedures Method Gas Inoculum produced NL [kg.
The operating regions are defined for this batch fermentation using knowledge of the reactions that take place within the fermenter and the operating conditions that are applied in the control and scheduling of the process variables.
A simulation of a batch fermentation process was used to determine the suitability of a local dynamic model structure for modelling batch processes.
In shaking flask batch fermentations were performed in 250ml Erlenmeyer flask containing 100ml of corn cob hydrolysate medium by adding 10 g [l.
Batch fermentations were carried out without pH-control during the first assay of culture.
Generally antibiotics are produced by fed batch fermentation using free cell cultures.
chrysogenum in calcium alginate are more efficient for the production of CPC with repeated batch fermentation in ALR.
Kinetic parameters for batch fermentations were determined after Pirt (Pirt S.