bastard

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bastard

adjective
(1) Born out of wedlock; illegitimate.
(2) Not genuine; adulterated; ersatz.

noun A popular term for an extremely unpleasant, rude and/or malicious person.

bastard

atypical, or unusual form of, a disease or plant.

bastard lentil
ervumervilia.
bastard strangles
bastard wing
see alula.
References in periodicals archive ?
63) Bastardy statutes were civil laws that had quasi-criminal features, such as the ability to arrest fathers who failed to support their out-of-wedlock offspring.
Sp-LA 44) preserves the essential elements of drunkenness, repulsiveness, and bastardy.
I condone this bastardy, the only cross-breeding that the ancestral beliefs do not condemn: that of language, not that of the blood.
Meanwhile, magistrates held bachelors accountable for their sexual misdeeds by prosecuting white bastardy cases and forcing fathers support their illegitimate offspring.
Domestic harmony begets domestic harmony, as the marital bed regains its former sanctity, and bastardy and license lose their grip on society.
There is an innate immorality in the conduct of an adult who for over a decade accepts and proclaims a child as his own, but then, in order to be relieved of the child's support, announces, and relies upon, his bastardy.
The yard man, himself the object of the white man's scorn and hate but powerless to strike out against the real source of his rage, refuses Joe sympathy and instead spews vitriol about Joe's bastardy.
bastardy law) were incorporated into citizenship law, limiting citizenship transmission between American fathers and their nonmarital children while readily allowing for citizenship transmission between American mothers and their nonmarital children.
Apart from this scene's suggestion that contemporary culture increasingly blurs the line between adolescent play and adult terror--a suggestion that Taymor herself makes in her stage directions for the screenplay (Taymor and Shakespeare 2000, 19)--the unnamed child, with no parents present in the opening scene, embodies concepts of both familial and cultural bastardy that the play itself explores.
The family feud raises the specter of bastardy that on the national level had marked the Protestant succession ever since the illegitimate Monmouth's ill-fated rebellion against James II.
So thy surviving husband shall remain The scornful mark of every open eye, Thy kinsmen hang their heads at this disdain, Thy issue blurred with nameless bastardy, And thou, the author of their obloquy, Shalt have thy trespass cited up in rhymes And sung by children in succeeding times.