basophilia


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basophilia

 [ba″so-fil´e-ah]
1. abnormal increase of basophils in the blood, seen in myxedema, hypothyroid conditions, ulcerative colitis, certain types of anemia, and other conditions. Called also basophilic leukocytosis.
2. the reaction of immature erythrocytes to basic dyes, so that they become blue or gray in color; stippling appears in lead poisoning.

ba·so·phil·i·a

(bā'sō-fil'ē-ă),
1. A condition in which there are more than the usual number of basophilic leukocytes in the circulating blood (basophilic leukocytosis) or an increase in the proportion of parenchymatous basophilic cells in an organ (in the bone marrow, basophilic hyperplasia).
2. A condition in which basophilic erythrocytes are found in circulating blood, as in certain instances of leukemia, advanced anemia, malaria, and plumbism. Synonym(s): Grawitz basophilia
3. The reaction of immature erythrocytes to basic dyes whereby the cells appear blue or contain bluish granules.
4. Beta adenohypophysis.
Synonym(s): basophilism

basophilia

/ba·so·phil·ia/ (ba″so-fil´e-ah)
1. abnormal increase of basophils in the blood.
2. reaction of immature erythrocytes to basic dyes, becoming blue to gray in color; stippling is seen in lead poisoning.

basophilia

(bā′sə-fĭl′ē-ə, -zə-)
n.
1. The affinity of cellular structures for basic dyes, such as methylene blue.
2. An increase in the number of basophils in the circulating blood.
3. An abnormal stippling of red blood cells with basic staining granules.

basophilia

Haematology
Basophilic leukocytosis
An increase in basophilic granulocytes in the peripheral blood.

Pathology
Having an affinity for basic dyes.

basophilia

Basophilic leukocytosis Hematology An absolute basophil count of > 100/mm3

ba·so·phil·i·a

(bā'sō-fil'ē-ă)
1. A condition in which there are more than the usual number of basophilic leukocytes in the circulating blood (basophilic leukocytosis) or an increase in the proportion of parenchymatous basophilic cells in an organ (in the bone marrow, basophilic hyperplasia).
2. A condition in which basophilic erythrocytes are found in circulating blood, as in certain instances of leukemia, advanced anemia, malaria, and lead poisoning.
3. The reaction of immature erythrocytes to basic dyes whereby the cells appear blue or contain bluish granules.
Synonym(s): basophilism.

basophilia

A rise in the proportion of BASOPHIL white cells in the blood. Punctate basophilia is a disorder of young red cells which show several deep blue dots on Romanowsky staining. This is a feature of any severe ANAEMIA but especially of BETA-THALASSAEMIA and lead poisoning.

Grawitz,

Paul, German pathologist, 1850-1932.
Grawitz basophilia - a condition in which basophilic erythrocytes are found in circulating blood, as in certain instances of leukemia, advanced anemia, malaria, and plumbism. Synonym(s): basophilia
Grawitz tumor - obsolete term for renal adenocarcinoma.

basophilia

above-normal levels of basophils within circulating blood

ba·so·phil·i·a

(bā'sō-fil'ē-ă)
A condition in which there are more than the usual number of basophilic leukocytes in the circulating blood (basophilic leukocytosis) or an increase in the proportion of parenchymatous basophilic cells in an organ (in the bone marrow, basophilic hyperplasia).

basophilia (bā´sōfil´ēə),

n an aggregate of blue-staining granules found in erythrocytes; seen in lead poisoning, leukemia, malaria, severe anemias, and certain toxemias.

basophilia

1. the reaction of relatively immature erythrocytes to basic dyes whereby the stained cells appear blue, gray or grayish-blue, or bluish granules appear.
2. abnormal increase of basophilic leukocytes in the blood.
3. basophilic leukocytosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The wide diversity of types of cells and staining properties of spider tissues is particularly well demonstrated by the intense basophilia with Azure B due to high concentrations of RNA in the large secretory cells of the mid gut epithelium (Figs.
The differential diagnosis of CML includes granulocytic leukemoid reactions, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL), and reactive causes of eosinophilia, basophilia, and monocytosis.
At various times after fetal death, nuclear basophilia staining may be lost in the kidneys, liver, heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, adrenal gland, and trachea The earliest loss of basophilia occurs is in the cortical tubules of the kidneys This change occurs approximately four hours after fetal death.
Several other cases of t(5;12) with eosinophilia or basophilia may represent additional cases but confirmatory testing was not performed [5, 9,10].
The most prominent lesions were basophilia and macrophage aggregates, which were found in 10 and 6 of the samples, respectively.
Histologically, there is a loss of cartilage basophilia, cartilage necrosis, and mixed inflammation that extends from the perichondrium and permeates toward the middle, without cyst formation.
In chronic myelogen ous leukemia, it will reveal basophilia and eosinophilia, with numerous early myeloid forms.
Chronic myeloid leukemia is a pluripotential stem cell disorder characterised by anemia, markedly elevated leucocyte count with shift to left in the myeloid series, basophilia, often thrombocytosis and splenomegaly.
1,11,23) Basophilia in birds has been associated with physiologic stress and forced molting, (28,32) but the function is not fully understood.
1 Typical presentations of CML include high white count dominated by mature myeloid cells, with basophilia and eosinophilia in the peripheral blood, and a bone marrow showing a myeloid dominant maturation with atypical micromegakaryocytes in tight clusters.
When seen in CSF in viral meningitis, they will demonstrate pleomorphism with variation in size, appearance and basophilia.
These changes included minimal degeneration of some proximal convoluted tubules, apoptosis, tubular basophilia, tubular casts, increased mitotic figures, and mononuclear cellular infiltrates.