basilicon


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Related to basilicon: basilican, Basilikon Doron

basilicon

An ointment composed of wax, pitch, resin, olive oil, lard or other fatty substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
King James I, Elizabeth's successor, described the nature of royalty in his Basilicon Doron, a royal treatise on kingship dedicated to his son.
For more about the influence of the coup on Basilicon Doron see Goodare,
24) Mark Fortier has recently shown how strongly King James in his True Law of Free Monarchies (1598) and Basilicon Doron (1599) praised legal equity and advocated it in his struggles with common-law proponent Sir Edward Coke, most notably in The Earl of Oxford's Case (1616).
The Daemonologie is present as are Basilicon Doron, The Trew Law of Free Monarchies, A Counterblaste to Tobacco, and A Meditation Upon the 27.
The strength of Shuger's analysis becomes evident when she looks at Measure for Measure's duke, an example of a "sacred monarch" whose type is illustrated in such texts as Desiderius Erasmus' Education of a Christian Prince, Martin Bucer's De regno Christi, and James I's Basilicon Doron.
By focusing on conscience in William Perkins's Discourse of Conscience, James VI and I's Basilicon Doron, and Shakespeare's history plays, particularly Henry V, I hope to illuminate tensions between individual judgment and obligations to authority within the concept of conscience that give us more precise understanding of religious and national identity in early modern England.
En 1598 Jacobo VI de Escocia, futuro rey de Inglaterra, publico su Basilicon Doron, libro de consejos sobre el modo de gobernar dedicado a su heredero, el principe Enrique.
Greimas, Fredric Jameson, Julia Kristeva, and Gilles Deleuze, focuses them on discursive data from James I's Basilicon Doron, and identifies an ideologeme which acts as a 'base narrative program' (p.
NO adequate gloss exists for the use of the term `Candie-souldier' in book three of Basilicon Doron:
James I's Basilicon Doron, offered as exemplifying the affirmation of divine right by a flawed king, has elsewhere been judged ~confused and contradictory',(2) and such contradictory views are explored empirically in much medieval and Renaissance literature and drama, notably in Shakespeare's Plantagenet series.
62) James's Basilicon Doron had referred to this version of the origins of Britain, and writers such as Anthony Munday drew on it.