basic fuchsin


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Related to basic fuchsin: Pararosaniline, methylene blue

fuchsin

 [fūk´sin]
any of several red to purple dyes, sometimes specifically basic fuchsin.
acid fuchsin a mixture of sulfonated fuchsins; used in various complex stains.
basic fuchsin a histologic stain, containing predominantly pararosaniline and rosaniline.

ba·sic fuch·sin

[C.I. 42500]
a triphenylmethane dye the dominant component of which is pararosanilin; an important stain in histology, histochemistry, and bacteriology.
Synonym(s): diamond fuchsin

ba·sic fuch·sin

(bā'sik fūk'sin)
[CI 42500] A triphenylmethane dye the dominant component of which is pararosanilin; an important stain in histology, histochemistry, and bacteriology.

fuchsin

any of several red to purple dyes.

acid fuchsin
a mixture of sulfonated fuchsins; used in various complex stains.
basic fuchsin
a histological stain, a mixture of pararosaniline, rosaniline and magenta II. Also, a mixture of rosaniline and pararosaniline hydrochlorides used as a local anti-infective.
References in periodicals archive ?
5-20 mg/L and high concentration range of 100-1000 mg/L of basic fuchsin dye in Fig.
For comparison of these two types of regression, both linear and non-linear fitting was carried out for basic fuchsin dye in the low concentration range for pseudo first order and pseudo second order kinetics.
The dye adsorption and removal% for basic fuchsin and methyl violet dye are compared with reported works with different hydrogels in Table 5.
Storage of sputum, staining and pot smear: After making a direct smear, equal volume of phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin solution was added to the sputum sample in its plastic container, rotated gently for a few seconds and left at ambient conditions (22 to 26[degrees]C) in a closed box for 7 days.
Therefore, the pot-method, in which phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin is used as the staining agent can be practiced on work benches in microscopy centres with inadequate facilities and the risk of acquiring tuberculosis infection can be minimized.
In conclusion, our findings suggests that sputum samples in their containers can be stored for up to 7 days with phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin solution and their smears can then be decolourised and counter-stained for detection of AFB.
Staining by phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin of sputum in pot for detection of acid-fast bacilli.
Therefore, the objectives of the present study were (i) to stain the sputum samples in their containers with phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin solution and to decolourise and counter-stain the stained sputum smears for detection of AFB (henceforth called pot method, and (ii) to compare the proportion of AFB positives obtained in pot and standard ZN methods.
Therefore, phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin stained sputum smears can be made on work-benches in any clinical laboratories.
In a preliminary experiment it was found that AFB in sputum can be adequately stained by phenol ammonium sulphate basic fuchsin solution in about 60 min.