base substitution

base substitution

The replacement of a single nucleotide in a nucleic acid (e.g., in DNA or RNA) which can be silent—due to “degeneracy” of DNA, in which multiple codons encode the same amino acid—or result in a point mutation with a substituted amino acid or premature termination of transcription or translation.

base substitution

replacement of a NUCLEOTIDE base in a DNA molecule with another base, possibly producing a SUBSTITUTION MUTATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first SNP was a base substitution (T[right arrow]C) at 367 bp of coding region in exon 2, which changed a leucine to a serine in protein sequence.
Moreover, is has been demonstrated that the process exhibits specific base substitution preferences (Betz et al.
This led to the discovery of the base substitution in the SMPX gene in all of the family members affected by the hearing impairment.
Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 differentiates several classes of carcinogens and mutagens by base substitution specificity.
For the lymphocytoma case, we found 2 base substitutions, the same as those of the erythema migrans cases, including the nonconserved base substitution (online Appendix Figure, panel C).
A capture oligonucleotide was designed to contain the sequence located immediately downstream of a base substitution in the OGG1 gene.
To characterize the underlying base substitution of the BclI polymorphism, we directly sequenced the PCR product using the Thermo Sequenase[TM] Radiolabeled Terminator Cycle Sequencing Kit (USB Corporation) according to the manufacturer's instructions.
A SNP is a single base substitution within the approximately 3 billion base pairs in the DNA sequence of the 23 chromosomes from one human.
G 1388 T] polymorphism cosegregated in all cases with the synonymous base substitution [rpoB.
Using the established conditions for base substitution detection with HDA-UHG in a capillary format, we analyzed all five mutations using 0.
A SNP is a single base substitution of one nucleotide with another, and both versions are observed in the general population at a frequency greater than 1%.

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