basal-bolus insulin therapy

basal-bolus insulin therapy

An insulin regimen for diabetic patients in which patients use short- or rapid-acting insulins before each meal (bolus doses) and a long-acting insulin once a day (basal dose).

Patient care

A typical regimen uses approximately equal doses of long-acting insulin (such as glargine) and short- or rapid-acting insulins. The total dose of premeal insulin is either divided into thirds (if a patient consumes roughly equal amounts of carbohydrates at each meal) or is adjusted so that the meal with the greatest carbohydrate load is covered by a proportionately larger dose of rapid-acting insulin

References in periodicals archive ?
Insulin degludec improves long-term glycaemic control similarly to insulin glargine but with fewer hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes on basal-bolus insulin therapy.
Glytec's patented eGlycemic Management System (eGMS) will be a focal point of the health system's diabetes service line, offering clinicians a set of tools, technologies and processes proven to achieve full adoption of basal-bolus insulin therapy, the standard of care and best practice endorsed by the American Diabetes Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.
Basal-bolus insulin therapy and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A review of the literature.
It will be developed and validated initially for people with diabetes on basal-bolus insulin therapy, but the underlying approach can be adapted to other chronic diseases.
Randomized Study of Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy in the Inpatient Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes (RABBIT 2 Trial).
The subgroup of patients receiving basal-bolus insulin therapy at baseline and at Week 12 allowed a 'like with like' comparison of changes in insulin dosing to be made.
The basal-bolus insulin therapy is easier to implement when continuous short-acting insulin is given using an insulin pump.
Participants were enrolled in one of three treatment groups: 1) type 1 diabetes treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy using carb counting; 2) type 2 diabetes treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy without counting carbs; and 3) type 2 diabetes treated with twice-daily biphasic insulin.
A 1-year, prospective, observational study of Japanese outpatients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes switching from insulin glargine or detemir to insulin degludec in basal-bolus insulin therapy (Kuma moto Insulin Degludec Observational study).
Blood glucose values of patients who received bolus-only insulin therapy were compared to glucose values for patients who received basal-bolus insulin therapy.
The results of this study suggest that patients previously treated with insulin may benefit more from basal-bolus insulin therapy, whereas insulin-naive patients may benefit equally with both regimens, although biphasic insulin may be more convenient.