barotrauma


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Related to barotrauma: Sinus barotrauma, volutrauma

barotrauma

 [bar″o-traw´mah]
injury caused by pressure differences between the external environment and the inside of a bodily structure. Seen with structures of the ear, in high altitude flyers and others (see barotitis media and barosinusitis). In the lung it is caused by excessive airway pressures, resulting in extra-alveolar air, as in pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, or pneumoperitoneum.

bar·o·trau·ma

(băr'ō-traw'mă),
A term previously used to describe injury to the middle ear or paranasal sinuses, resulting from imbalance between ambient pressure and that within the affected cavity. Now mostly used to refer to lung injury due to pressure such as occurs when a patient is on a ventilator and is subjected to high airway pressure (pulmonary barotrauma).
[G. baros, weight, + trauma]

barotrauma

/baro·trau·ma/ (-traw´mah) injury due to pressure, as to structures of the ear, in high-altitude flyers, owing to differences between atmospheric and intratympanic pressures; see barosinusitis and barotitis.

barotrauma

[ber′ōtrô′mə, -trou′mə]
Etymology: Gk, baros + trauma, wound
physical injury sustained as a result of exposure to changing air pressure, or rupture of the tympanic membranes, as may occur among scuba divers or caisson workers or anyone near nuclear or atomic blasts. Barotrauma may be iatrogenic as in the case of excessive ventilator pressures leading to lung injury. Compare decompression sickness.

barotrauma

ENT
Middle-ear injury which occurs while flying or scuba diving, caused by major disparities in air pressure between the middle ear and the nasopharynx—which is usually equilibrated by an open eustachian tube.
 
Clinical findings
Disequilibrium, disorientation, nausea, vomiting.

Sports medicine
Tissue injury due to the failure of a gas-filled body space—e.g., lungs, middle ear, sinuses—to equilibrate internal pressure to ambient pressure; because the cavities located within a bone cannot collapse, the space they occupy is filled with oedema in the mucosal membrane or haemorrhage. Barotrauma often results from rapid or extreme changes in external pressure—e.g., explosions.

barotrauma

Audiology Middle ear injury caused by ↑ air pressure; trauma to the inner ear 2º to atmospheric pressure alteration, which occurs while flying or deep water diving, resulting in ↓ visual and proprioceptive cues due to ↓ vestibular input Clinical Disequilibrium, disorientation, N&V Sports medicine Tissue injury due to the failure of a gas-filled body space–eg, lungs, middle ear, sinuses, to equalize internal pressure to ambient pressure; barotrauma often results from rapid or extreme changes in external pressure–eg, explosions. See Atmospheric inner ear barotruma, Pulmonary barotrauma.

bar·o·trau·ma

(bar'ō-traw'mă)
1. Injury to the middle ear or paranasal sinuses, resulting from imbalance between ambient pressure and that within the affected cavity.
See also: aerotitis, barotitis media
2. Lung injury that occurs when a patient is on a ventilator and is subjected toexcessive airway pressure (pulmonary barotrauma).
[G. baros, weight, + trauma]

barotrauma

Injury resulting from changes in atmospheric (barometric) pressure as in aircraft flight. Barotrauma mostly affects the ear drums when there is obstruction to the EUSTACHIAN TUBES. The most serious forms of barotrauma result from explosive noise which can literally shake the delicate hair-cell transducers in the middle ear to pieces.

barotrauma

damage caused by change in pressure around the body (ambient pressure). Divers can be affected painfully by inequality between high ambient pressure at depth and that in closed internal air-containing spaces: the sinuses or the middle ear (aural barotrauma: inward bulging or at worst rupture of the eardrum, if the Eustachian tube is blocked). During surfacing the danger is pulmonary barotrauma: rupture of the lung surface by expanding air, with escape into the pleural cavity (pneumothorax) when surfacing without effective exhalation. See also decompression illness, diving.
References in periodicals archive ?
99) Barotrauma is defined as "hemorrhage in the lungs due to a sudden drop in air pressure," and bats must be within one to two meters of wind turbine blades for this to occur.
She said: "There are bats with no broken bones or evidence of trauma who have pulmonary and ear haemorrhages which implies they suffered barotrauma.
T] accurately to avoid underventilation or overdistension, deliver accurate pressures to avoid barotrauma, and has the ability to optimise PEEP to avoid atelectrauma and maintain the set Fi[O.
1 may be overestimated, because the premature ovulation caused by barotrauma results in POFs appearing before they normally would.
This fish displayed minor signs of barotrauma (slightly distended eyes and bloated abdomen) upon recapture, but appeared to be in good physical condition when taken back to Anacapa Island for a second time.
North Northumberland coroner, Tony Brown, recorded a narrative verdict, saying "post-mortem examination established that Dr Fletcher's death may have been due to natural causes, as a result of a bicuspid aortic valve, barotrauma due to rapid though controlled ascent to the surface, or a combination of these causes.
She said the heart valve problem could have played a role and Dr Fletcher's rapid ascent had resulted in barotrauma, air bubbles getting into her system.
Also known as "the bends," barotrauma occurs when a sudden drop in air pressure near moving turbine blades causes lung hemorrhage in bats, similar to what is experienced by scuba divers who ascend or descend too quickly during deep-sea exploration.
Differences in the performance of VHI, such as inspiratory flow rates, plateau time, peak pressures and volumes delivered, raise concerns about the efficacy of treatment and patient safety with regards to barotrauma and volutrauma.
Airplane Ear: Barotrauma or airplane ear occurs when the air pressure in your middle ear (more specifically, the Eustachian tube) and the air pressure in your environment are out of balance.
Minimising flight nurses' exposure to any additional risk during flight (eg barotrauma from sinusitis) is managed through education and training.