bark

(redirected from barks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bark

(bark),
1. The envelope or covering of the roots, trunk, and branches of plants. Barks of pharmacologic significance not listed below are alphabetized under specific names.
2. Synonym(s): cinchona

bark

(bahrk) the rind or outer cortical cover of the woody parts of a plant, tree, or shrub.
cramp bark  the dried bark of Viburnum opulus, the high bush or cranberry tree; it has been used as an antispasmodic, uterine sedative, and antiscorbutic.
elm bark , slippery elm bark the dried inner bark of the slippery elm, Ulmus rubra, which is mucilaginous and demulcent.
white willow bark  a preparation of the bark of various Salix species collectively known as white willow, containing salicin, a precursor of salicylic acid; used as an antiinflammatory and antipyretic.
yohimbe bark  a preparation of the bark of Pausinystalia yohimbe, used for the same indications as yohimbine hydrochloride; it has also been used traditionally as an aphrodisiac and for skin diseases and obesity.

bark

Botany
The outer covering of trees and some plants, which consists of a cuticle (epidermis), outer bark (cortex) and inner bark (fibre).
 
Herbal medicine
(1) China, see there.
(2) Cinchona, see there; Cinchona species.
 
Veterinary medicine
The harsh sound uttered by a dog.

bark

the outer, living part of a woody stem, consisting of three layers:
  1. an inner layer called secondary PHLOEM, containing the elements of primary phloem plus horizontal ray cells which function in transporting materials across the stem.
  2. a middle layer of cork CAMBIUM, a group of meristematic (dividing) cells originating in the PARENCHYMA cells of the outer stem cortex. As the cells divide, the outer ones develop into cork cells and the inner ones give rise to parenchyma-like tissue.
  3. CORK, an outer region of cells forming a waterproof and protective layer broken only by LENTICELS.

bark

1. the voice of the dog.
2. the outer covering of a tree.

bark eating
a form of pica often indicative of boredom, nutritional deficiency of fiber or behavioral problem.
bark suppression
References in classic literature ?
You are at the foot of Glenn's," returned the other, speaking aloud, without fear of consequences within the roar of the cataract; "and the next thing is to make a steady landing, lest the canoe upset, and you should go down again the hard road we have traveled faster than you came up; 'tis a hard rift to stem, when the river is a little swelled; and five is an unnatural number to keep dry, in a hurry-skurry, with a little birchen bark and gum.
Near Port Famine I have seen more large trees than anywhere else: I measured a Winter's Bark which was four feet six inches in girth, and several of the beech were as much as thirteen feet.
Our outside and often thin and fanciful clothes are our epidermis, or false skin, which partakes not of our life, and may be stripped off here and there without fatal injury; our thicker garments, constantly worn, are our cellular integument, or cortex; but our shirts are our liber, or true bark, which cannot be removed without girdling and so destroying the man.
Of these, seven are for us, and one for you, provided, of course, that you will make believe you are sleeping and will not bark for the Farmer.
The bark I had wrote on to tell you we'd gone pirating.
This seemed to Alice a good opportunity for making her escape; so she set off at once, and ran till she was quite tired and out of breath, and till the puppy's bark sounded quite faint in the distance.
Just as the old man was leaving the house the little dog under the table began to bark, saying:
Don Quixote made answer, "Thou must know, Sancho, that this bark is plainly, and without the possibility of any alternative, calling and inviting me to enter it, and in it go to give aid to some knight or other person of distinction in need of it, who is no doubt in some sore strait; for this is the way of the books of chivalry and of the enchanters who figure and speak in them.
Should our bark be upset we are five of us good swimmers, able enough to turn it over again, or if not, to hold on by it.
The instant that Mohegan observed himself to be noticed by the group around the young stranger, he dropped the blanket which covered the upper part of his frame, from his shoulders, suffering it to fall over his leggins of untanned deer-skin, where it was retained by a belt of bark that confined it to his waist.
He would leap at him, and sniff and bark joyously, then run to the door and back again.
Father, I have learnt what the dogs say when they bark.