bark

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bark

(bark),
1. The envelope or covering of the roots, trunk, and branches of plants. Barks of pharmacologic significance not listed below are alphabetized under specific names.
2. Synonym(s): cinchona

bark

(bahrk) the rind or outer cortical cover of the woody parts of a plant, tree, or shrub.
cramp bark  the dried bark of Viburnum opulus, the high bush or cranberry tree; it has been used as an antispasmodic, uterine sedative, and antiscorbutic.
elm bark , slippery elm bark the dried inner bark of the slippery elm, Ulmus rubra, which is mucilaginous and demulcent.
white willow bark  a preparation of the bark of various Salix species collectively known as white willow, containing salicin, a precursor of salicylic acid; used as an antiinflammatory and antipyretic.
yohimbe bark  a preparation of the bark of Pausinystalia yohimbe, used for the same indications as yohimbine hydrochloride; it has also been used traditionally as an aphrodisiac and for skin diseases and obesity.

bark

Botany
The outer covering of trees and some plants, which consists of a cuticle (epidermis), outer bark (cortex) and inner bark (fibre).
 
Herbal medicine
(1) China, see there.
(2) Cinchona, see there; Cinchona species.
 
Veterinary medicine
The harsh sound uttered by a dog.

bark

the outer, living part of a woody stem, consisting of three layers:
  1. an inner layer called secondary PHLOEM, containing the elements of primary phloem plus horizontal ray cells which function in transporting materials across the stem.
  2. a middle layer of cork CAMBIUM, a group of meristematic (dividing) cells originating in the PARENCHYMA cells of the outer stem cortex. As the cells divide, the outer ones develop into cork cells and the inner ones give rise to parenchyma-like tissue.
  3. CORK, an outer region of cells forming a waterproof and protective layer broken only by LENTICELS.

bark

1. the voice of the dog.
2. the outer covering of a tree.

bark eating
a form of pica often indicative of boredom, nutritional deficiency of fiber or behavioral problem.
bark suppression
References in classic literature ?
They jumped aside in a great fright, then all of them turned to follow the snake, saying that this was what the dog was barking at.
Upon the outside several hundred other baboons were tearing and tugging in his aid, and all were roaring and jabbering and barking at the top of their lungs.
Shortly before ten o'clock the stillness of the air grew quite oppressive,and the silence was so marked that the bleating of a sheep inland or the barking of a dog in the town was distinctly heard, and the band on the pier, with its lively French air, was like a dischord in the great harmony of nature's silence.
Fastened by chains to the mainmast were a number of grisly staghounds, who now began leaping and barking at me, and by the mizzen a huge puma was cramped in a little iron cage far too small even to give it turning room.
The gate of the enclosure was shut; but he leaped over the hedge, and in spite of the barking of a chained-up dog, went up to the cabin.
To-day is the 29th of August; the 21st of September will, therefore, be the conclusion of the term agreed on, and till that time arrives -- and it is the advice of a gentleman which I am about to give you -- till then we will refrain from growling and barking like two dogs chained within sight of each other.
So we rolled, barking and yelping, into Kalka for lunch, and Garm ate enough for two.
Just let me go down to the barking dogs, and give me something that I can throw to them; they will do nothing to harm me.
They could hear Nana barking, and John whimpered, "It is because he is chaining her up in the yard," but Wendy was wiser.
The first thing I heard was Nobs barking furiously; evidently he had missed me and was searching.
At one house a dog was barking, at another a woman, covering her head with her coat, came running from somewhere and entered the door of a hut, stopping on the threshold to have a look at the passing sledge.
Some of them howled lamentably at times, and every little while, as if it were all that remained for them to do in their narrow cells, all of them would break out into barking.