magnet

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Related to bar magnet: horseshoe magnet

magnet

 [mag´net]
an object having polarity (oppositely charged ends) and capable of attracting iron.

mag·net

(mag'net),
1. A body that has the property of attracting particles of iron, cobalt, nickel, or various other metallic alloys and that, when freely suspended, tends to assume a definite direction between the magnetic poles of the Earth (magnetic polarity).
2. A bar or horseshoe-shaped piece of iron or steel that has been made magnetic by contact with another magnet or, as in an electromagnet, by passage of electric current around a metallic (iron) core.
3. An electromagnet built in a cylindrical configuration to accommodate a patient in its core, for magnetic resonance imaging.
[G. magnēs]

magnet

/mag·net/ (mag´nit) an object having polarity and capable of attracting iron.magnet´ic
An iron-based mass or bar with magnetic polarity

mag·net

(mag'nĕt)
1. A body that has the property of attracting particles of iron, cobalt, nickel, or any of various metallic alloys and that when freely suspended tends to assume a definite direction between the magnetic poles of the earth (magnetic polarity).
2. A bar or horseshoe-shaped piece of iron or steel that has been made magnetic by contact with another magnet or, as in an electromagnet, by passage of electric current around a metallic (iron) core.
3. An electromagnet built in a cylindric configuration to accommodate a patient in its core, for magnetic resonance imaging.
[G. magnēs]

magnet

an object having polarity and capable of attracting iron.

oral dose magnet
see reticular magnet.
reticular magnet
a magnet placed in the reticulum to attract and isolate sharp metal and help to prevent traumatic reticuloperitonitis in ruminants.

Patient discussion about magnet

Q. who much cost the resonance magnetic machine? new or used

A. here is a company that you can even get a MRI scanner in a leasing program:
http://www.nationwideimaging.com/index.php

Q. hey guys! has anyone ever tried a chinese magnet to help a diet?? Somwone I know who is a chinse medicine healer, gave me a special magnet you stick to the right thumb of your hand to help evoid snack attacks. Did you ever hear anything about it?? did iot help anyone??

A. i tried magnets. not to dieting but magnets to the feet. supposed to help in giving energy while walking (i hike a lot). couldn't say i felt a big difference, but i only tried it for a day- so i don't know...

More discussions about magnet
References in periodicals archive ?
The material to be treated is conveyed through an electrode array where this alternating energy causes polar molecules in the material to continuously reorient themselves to face opposite poles much like the way bar magnets behave in an alternating magnetic field.
18 ( ANI ): A post grad student from Nigeria took the help of simple bar magnets to demonstrate scientifically why gay marriages are wrong, insisting that "like" does not attract "like".
Eriez Bar Magnets are available in a variety of sizes, and can be used in a wide range of separation and automation applications.
Bar magnets and compass needles are examples of larger magnetic dipoles.
As part of his PhD, Jacklyn decided to observe magnetic cues during mound repair, so he cut the top 10-15 cm off eight mounds at each of four sites near Darwin and manipulated the magnetic field experienced by the termites by burying powerful bar magnets in the mound, below the cut surface.
The process of evolution has driven magnetotactic bacteria to make perfect little bar magnets, which differ strikingly from anything found outside biology,'' said co-author Joseph Kirschvink, a geobiologist from the California Institute of Technology.
Material is conveyed through an electrode array where this alternating energy causes polar molecules in the material to continuously reorient themselves to face opposite poles much like the way bar magnets behave in an alternating magnetic field.
But microprocessors employing nanometer-sized bar magnets - like tiny refrigerator magnets - for memory, logic and switching operations theoretically would require no moving electrons.
Just as two bar magnets can attract or repel each another, the MRFM's magnetic tip is attracted or repelled by the spins in the sample.
But some elements have unpaired electrons that spin in a way that makes their atoms into tiny bar magnets, with a north and a south pole.
In flat graphite layers the movement of the electrons do not affect the spin and the small bar magnets point in random directions.
When zapped with electricity, the floating particles act like bar magnets, says food engineer James Steffe.