bar chart

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bar chart

A visual display of the size of the different categories of a variable; the categories or values of the variable are represented by bars of different lengths.
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Bar charts that reflect comparative data can be used to highlight significant changes during the year or to compare financial statement elements within a year.
Order in relation to other elements: Horizontal bar chart (see exhibit 2, below, right).
Figure 1 is a simple example of a bar chart showing net income over a series of six years.
A Copy button is conveniently included on the introductory and intermediate chart layouts, allowing you to add pie and bar charts to other FileMaker databases by simply updating field names and field labels.
A new charting module includes both 2D and 3D bar and stacked bar charts, area charts, and pie, line and scatter charts.
The repository is automatically queried in real time and the appropriate information is generated in the form of pie charts, bar charts, timelines and diagrams.
These include a waveform display that supports visualization of overlapping transactions and transaction relationships; a flexible spreadsheet for sorting, filtering, and isolating the transactions of interest; graphical pie charts and bar charts for performance analysis; and a unique transaction comparison engine for high-level analysis across multiple simulations.
Using the ChartXplore widgets, programmers can produce virtually any type of 2D graph, including XY plots, bar charts, area charts, logarithmic scientific charts and financial graphs.
Easily add, delete, move, reshape or resize images, including individual graphical elements in pie and bar charts without having to manipulate the entire graphic.
2 features new bar charts that make relationships in data much more clear, better number labeling, an improved column relationships tool and a depivoting tool.
When that happens on graphics like pie charts or bar charts, two colors will look the same and the chart loses its information value.
A rare example of a 'universal' formula, this technique can be applied to almost any stock or commodity market, and requires little more than accurate line and bar charts.