ban

(redirected from bans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to bans: vans

BAN

Abbreviation for:
Bachelor of Arts in Nursing
British approved Approved Name (Medspeak-UK)
British Association of Neurologists (Medspeak-UK)

body area network

,

BAN

A group of wireless sensors worn by, or inserted into a patient, and used to monitor vital signs and other physiological parameters.

ban

quercusincana.
References in periodicals archive ?
The agency wants to hold all parties equally accountable for complying with the bans, Golledge remarks, because throwing recyclables away puts a strain on the state's already limited disposal capacity and also hurts manufacturers that rely on recycled feedstock.
circuit court of appeals upholds Florida's complete ban on adoption by gays in the case of four gay men seeking to adopt foster children already in their care.
MOJAVE - Mojave Unified School District will survey employees about the district ban against personal music players on campus aimed at shielding youngsters from vulgar music lyrics.
21 of this year, the Senate passed the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act and sent it to President Bush for his signature, thus enacting the first ever federal prohibition of a specific abortion procedure.
While the return of 6,000 postcards in favour of a smoking ban holds much promise for a smoke-free north, municipalities need to given ample time to prepare for smoking bans through public meetings, says Fort Frances.
Some people say that the law gives schools the legal responsibility to ban products such as peanuts that threaten some children's lives.
It is an appalling mistake to allow this man to walk free when he has shown life bans are no deterrent.
Radar detector bans do not decrease the number or severity of accidents.
In Wisconsin, local product bans and taxes were preempted in favor of a comprehensive recycling law.
The 'F1+' rating on the BANs is based on the town's long-term credit characteristics and demonstrated market access, as evidenced by the receipt of eight bids on its most recent BAN sale in 2005.
LAST YEAR RICHARD Sargent and Robert Shepard, two physicians who had campaigned for a smoking ban in Helena, Montana, announced that their efforts had paid off more dramatically than anyone could have imagined: The ordinance had led to an astonishing 60 percent drop in heart attacks in the six months after it took effect.