bank

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bank

 [bank]
a stored supply of human material or tissues for future use by other individuals, such as a blood bank, bone bank, eye bank, or skin bank.

bank

(bank),
Any facility for storage of viable preserved tissue, blood, or medical supplies for future study or use.
[Fr. banque, fr. It. banca, bench, teller's counter, fr. Germanic]

bank

(bangk) a stored supply of human material or tissues for future use by other individuals, such as a blood b., bone b., eye b., human-milk b., or skin b.

bank

A central repository for something of value, for future withdrawal or retrieval.

bank

A central repository of something of value, for future withdrawal or retrieval. See Blood bank, Brain bank, National Practitioner Data Bank, Organ Bank, Sperm bank, Tissue bank.

bank

(bangk)
Any facility for storage of viable preserved tissue, blood, or medical supplies for future study or use.
[Fr. banque, fr. It. banca, bench, teller's counter, fr. Germanic]

bank

a stored supply of animal material or tissues for future use by other individuals, as blood bank, serum bank, bone bank, skin bank, eye bank, etc. See also database.
References in periodicals archive ?
The actual angle of attack and bank angle change substantially at the beginning of the flight and converge into the command angle of attack and bank angle quickly.
If you approach the runway at different angles, turn to create one of these scenarios, or, if it's easier, just turn to an upwind over the runway and fly a pattern using your selected bank angle.
So you adjust by steepening the bank angle (less loss per 360) or getting out more drag (more loss per 360) to try to hit the right altitude on a subsequent turn.
Eyes out front to watch bank angle while adding back pressure to keep the nose level and prevent any altitude loss.
At its simplest, achieving and maintaining coordinated flight means using the proper amount of rudder input to match the airplane's rate of heading change to its bank angle, if any.
Bank angle in and of itself has no relationship to G forces.
Depending on the bank angle, of course, banking reduces the wings' production of vertical lift, in favor of the horizontal kind.
With a greater bank angle, we'll need some additional rudder input, to straighten us out and, again, maintain runway alignment.
Then as I studied the history of instrument flying I found out why rate procedures originated before bank angle procedures.
Since it's all geared to standard-rate turns, it's easy and safe to increase or decrease bank angle under visual control.