balm of Gilead


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balm of Gil·e·ad

an oleoresin from Commiphora opobalsamum (family Burseraceae), probably the myrrh of the Bible; used in perfumery.

balm of Gilead

(gĭl′ē-əd, -ăd′)
n.
1.
a. Any of several resinous trees or shrubs of the genus Commiphora, especially C. gileadensis, of northeastern Africa and Arabia.
b. Any of several North American poplar trees having aromatic, resinous buds, especially the balsam poplar and the hybrid species Populus ×jackii.
c. The aromatic resin of any of these plants.
2. A shrubby plant (Cedronella canariensis) in the mint family, native to Madeira and the Canary Islands, having fragrant leaves and pink flowers.

balm of Gilead

Herbal medicine
A deciduous tree, the leaf buds of which contain volatile oils—e.g., bisabolol, cineole, humulene, palicin, phenolic acids and salicin. Balm of Gilead has a long history as a medicinal herb; it said to be analgesic (due to its high content of salicin), antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and expectorant; it has been used topically for abscesses, burns, haemorrhoids and rheumatic complaints.

There are no peer-reviewed data to support the efficacy of balm of Gilead.

balm of Gilead

1. The balm or balsam carried from Gilead by the caravan of merchants to whom Joseph was sold by his brothers, probably balsam from Commiphora opobalsamum (C. gileadensis ), and probably the biblical myrrh. Synonym: balsam of Gilead; Mecca balsam
2. The balsam fir, Populus candicans, or its resin, used as an expectorant and an ointment.
See also: balm