bale

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bale

1. a package of wool in a wool pack weighing 150-250 lb depending largely on whether it is greasy or scoured.
2. a compressed bundle of hay, either about 100 lb tied with wire or twine, or large, round, untied bales, as big as a small hay stack and referred to as 'big bales'.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 million or 3,528,841 bales showing a percentage decrease of 3.
The 2015 "National Mixed Rigid Bale Composition Study" focuses on material in nontraditional bales of plastic.
Although round bale silage has been proposed as an alternative herbage storage practice where hay making is challenging, storing wilted herbage in individually wrapped bales is occasionally vulnerable to spoilage due to poor fermentation or broken plastic wrap.
He said that 99,62,296 cotton bales were sold to the textile units and exporters bought 3,15,804 bales.
Bales was expected to plead guilty, and the Associated Press (https://twitter.
The highest cottonseed output till July 31, 2010 was produced in Sindh, out of which around 267,450 bales of cotton would be produced.
Moreover, square bales are easier to haul as well as more marketable for customers with small livestock operations.
ARS engineer Mathew Pelletier says that while the loss of some 50,000 bales in one year is a very small number compared to a crop of 18 to 20 million bales, the loss to that one gin community was devastating.
If farmers wish to store bales on grassland, it is possible to do so as long as the bales are kept at least 10 metres away from any water, including field drains and ditches into which silage effluent could enter.
We were promised (by Antonovich's office) that they would act as a bridge between us and the neighbors, but instead they are acting as advocates for the Kagel Canyon opposition," Bales said.
Instead, recyclers would do better to concentrate on getting the densest, most even bales they can if they are looking to export material.
Following harvest, conventional rectilinear hay bales are stacked on the shelves around the outside of the barn forming an external insulation which changes colour from green to yellow to straw colour over the year--and changes area and shape as the farmer gradually removes bales for fodder.