bale

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bale

1. a package of wool in a wool pack weighing 150-250 lb depending largely on whether it is greasy or scoured.
2. a compressed bundle of hay, either about 100 lb tied with wire or twine, or large, round, untied bales, as big as a small hay stack and referred to as 'big bales'.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recyclers should give special care to the material type and size to be baled when specifying their balers.
For multiple materials recyclers, it should be noted that some new balers are equipped with computers that will allow the operator to change materials to be baled on the fly, quickly changing to the baler set-up most suited for that particular material.
Manufacturers are also seeing a boom in the types of materials being baled, including plastic, wet pulp and carpet padding.
The end result is a sizable contingent of balers on the job at grocery stores, big box retailers and other store locations throughout North America, generating a steady stream of baled OCC and helping provide a reliable supply of recovered fiber for paper mills throughout the world.
When that amount of wire is holding in a bale of plastic, the cost of the wire may exceed the value of the product that is baled," he remarks.
The upside to these systems, Harris notes, is that whatever is being baled, enough wire can be applied to secure it safely for the long-term.
With the aid of a forklift and driver, a variety of different grades can be baled in a single shift, including old newspapers (ONP), old corrugated containers (OCC), used beverage cans (UBCs), steel cans, PET and HDPE plastic bottles and sometimes mixed paper and other mixed plastics.
He says one of Bollegraaf's largest models can produce up to 85 tons per hour of some baled commodities.
An index maintained by the Corporations Supporting Recycling, Toronto, shows baled PET prices plunging in the second half of 2001, falling from an indexed number of 355 in July of 2001 all the way down to 110 in February of 2002.