bacterial STI

(redirected from bacterial sexually transmitted infection)

bacterial STI

Any sexually transmitted infection caused by bacteria, such as syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gonorrhoea is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection and, untreated, can enter the bloodstream or spread to the joints.
They then repeated this analysis in people who did not have a bacterial sexually transmitted infection so that bacterial infection would not affect the results.
Statistical analysis found several factors that made it more likely a man would he an HIV transmitter rather than a nontransmitter (Figure 1, hack row): (1) any detectable HIV in semen, (2) an HIV level at or above 40,000 copies in semen versus no detectable HIV in semen, (3) detectable versus undetectable CMV in semen, (4) a CMV level above 40,000 copies in semen versus no detectable CMV in semen, (5) detectable versus undetectable EBV in semen, and (6) any bacterial sexually transmitted infection.
01) for any bacterial sexually transmitted infection.
2 Previous work by other researchers found that people who pass HIV to a sex partner (1) have higher levels of HIV in blood and semen, (2) have a lower CD4 count, (3) tend not to be taking antiretroviral therapy, and (4) have a higher rate of bacterial sexually transmitted infections.
2-4) In developed countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, CT is the most commonly diagnosed bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) among adolescents and young adults.
It is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the UK.
Worrying rise in sexually transmitted infections:Gonorrhoea is the second most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the United Kingdom with 22,335 infections diagnosed in GUM clinics in 2004.
Historically regarded as "curable," bacterial sexually transmitted infections such as chlamydia and gonorrhea were effectively treated with antibiotics; however, over the years STIs have evolved and acquired resistance to many antibiotic treatments, resulting in a depleted pool of therapeutic options available to treat these increasingly common infections.