bacterial pneumonia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bacterial pneumonia: Walking pneumonia

bac·te·ri·al pneu·mo·ni·a

infection of the lung with any of a large variety of bacteria, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus).

bacterial pneumonia

pneumonia caused by bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and others.

bacterial pneumonia

Any pneumonia caused by a bacterial infection.

bac·te·ri·al pneu·mo·ni·a

(bak-terē-ăl nū-mōnē-ă)
Lung infection with any of a large variety of bacteria, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae.
References in periodicals archive ?
He adds that some people with acute bacterial pneumonia will cough up green or yellow mucus: "That gives the game away and there's probably bacterial infection," he says.
Thirty-six (36) cases of bacterial pneumonia complicated by parapneumonic empyema were identified.
One case (Figure 2, D) also showed areas of denser consolidation obscuring underlying parenchymal architecture and bronchovascular margins, consistent with a secondary bacterial pneumonia identified at autopsy.
And it doesn't necessarily always mean bacterial pneumonia, but it very much can mean that.
The majority of deaths during the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 were not caused by the influenza virus acting alone but were due to bacterial pneumonia following flu virus infection, according to a study in the Oct.
Instead, most victims succumbed to bacterial pneumonia following influenza virus infection.
A further RCT among HIV-positive adults in Malawi newly diagnosed with tuberculosis (4) found no significant difference in bacterial pneumonia (hazard ratio (HR) 1.
But doctors diagnosed bacterial pneumonia and kept Keith, 37, in at Leicester Royal Infirmary.
Bacterial pneumonia can be treated with antibiotics.
Infection can affect many different parts of the body but usually targets the respiratory tract, causing bacterial pneumonia.
In the early 1960s there were as many as 135 million cases of measles and over 6 million measles-related deaths annually, more than 50% as a result of either primary viral pneumonia or complicating bacterial pneumonia.
Symptoms vary depending on the type of infection, with viral pneumonia often imitating flu symptoms, while bacterial pneumonia tends to come on suddenly and involve severe chest pain, fever, mucus-producing cough and increased breathing rate.

Full browser ?